Ronnie O'Sullivan - Framed - Orion Publishing Group

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  • Paperback £7.99
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    • ISBN:9781409151319
    • Publication date:15 Jun 2017
  • E-Book £P.O.R.
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    • ISBN:9781409151326
    • Publication date:17 Nov 2016

Framed

By Ronnie O'Sullivan

  • Hardback
  • £16.99

The first crime novel from the UK's most charismatic sporting genius

Frankie James is a young man with a lot on his shoulders. His mother disappeared when he was sixteen; his father's in jail for armed robbery; and he owes rent on his Soho snooker club to one of London's toughest gangsters. Things, you'd think, can only get better. Actually, they're about to get a whole lot worse.

He always swore to his mum he'd keep his younger, wilder brother out of trouble, but when Jack turns up at the club, covered in someone else's blood, and with the cops hard on his heels, Frankie has no choice but to enter the sordid world of bent coppers, ruthless mobsters and twisted killers he's tried all his life to avoid.

But in the dog-eat-dog underworld of 1990s Soho - as a vicious gang war rages between London's two foremost crime families - will Frankie be tough enough, and smart enough to come out on top?

Biographical Notes

Since turning professional in 1992, O'Sullivan has clocked up an incredible number of awards and trophies, including the UK Championship, the China Open, the Regal Championships, the Benson and Hedges Masters and the British Open. In January 2000 O'Sullivan won the Nations Cup for England, boasting the best record of any player, 13 wins from 15 frames played.

Follow him on Twitter @ronnieo147

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781409151296
  • Publication date: 17 Nov 2016
  • Page count: 352
  • Imprint: Orion
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Authors:
Ronnie O'Sullivan

Ronnie is snooker's most written and talked about player, and its greatest showman. His supreme talent and style have made him the People's Champion and, as one commentator put it, 'the question is not how much does Ronnie O'Sullivan need snooker, but how much does snooker need Ronnie O'Sullivan?' At 15, Ronnie became the youngest player to compile a recognised maximum break during the English Amateur Championships. He turned professional in 1992 and won 38 successive matches that year alone. In 1993, at just 17, he became the youngest winner of a world ranking tournament when he defeated Stephen Hendry to win the UK Championships. In 1997 he recorded the fastest 147 break in history - in just 5 minutes and 20 seconds - and has gone on to better that three times. In 2001 he confirmed his legendary status by winning the Embassy World Title. But Ronnie's autobiography will reveal more just than just the sporting side of the man the BBC speculates 'could become the world's greatest ever'; it will also be a full and candid account of an extraordinary life. It will tell of the infant who was introduced to legendary snooker clubs at an impossibly early age, of the boy who was taking on and defeating all comers at 12 and frightening off the bookies in the process, of the teenager whose life was decimated when his father and mentor was sent to prison for life; of the man dubbed the 'genius' of the modern game who regularly threatens to quit the sport to pursue other interests at the grand old age of 28.

Bill James

Bill James (1929-) is the author of numerous thrillers and crime novels as well as a critical work on Anthony Powell. In 2006 he was shortlisted for the Crime Writers' Association's prestigious Duncan Lawrie Dagger award for the year's best crime novel for Wolves of Memory. His work is much loved and critically acclaimed; the Sunday Telegraph describes him as 'bruisingly good' and The Times as 'subtle and riveting to the last page'. He lives in his native South Wales.

Charlie Huston

Charlie Huston is the author of the Henry Thompson trilogy, the Joe Pitt casebooks, and the bestsellers THE SHOTGUN RULE and THE MYSTIC ARTS OF ERASING ALL SIGNS OF DEATH. He lives with his family in Los Angeles.

Dan Kavanagh

Dan Kavanagh was born in County Sligo in 1946. Having devoted his adolescence to truancy, venery and petty theft, he left home at seventeen and signed on as a deckhand on a Liberian tanker. After jumping ship at Montevideo, he roamed across the Americas taking a variety of jobs: he was a steer-wrestler, a waiter-on-roller-skates at a drive-in eatery in Tucson, and a bouncer in a gay bar in San Francisco. He is currently working in London at jobs he declines to specify, and lives in north Islington.

Dashiell Hammett

Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961) was born in Maryland and worked in a number of menial jobs until he became an operative for the Pinkerton Detective Agency. His experiences as a private detective laid the foundations for his writing career. His work includes Red Harvest, The Maltese Falcon, The Glass Key, The Thin Man and some eighty short stories, mostly published in Black Mask magazine.

Deborah Valentine

Deborah Valentine is a British author, editor and screenwriter who once lived in California but far preferred the British weather and fled to London, where she has lived for many years. Her crime novels feature former California sheriff Kevin Bryce and his artist girlfriend, Katharine Craig, charting their turbulent romance amidst murder and mayhem, and pushing the boundaries of the conventional mystery with their complex yet engaging characterisations. Unorthodox Methods is the first in the series, followed by A Collector of Photographs, and the Ireland-based Fine Distinctions. A Collector of Photographs was shortlisted for several awards, including an Edgar and a Macavity. Fine Distinctions was also shortlisted for an Edgar. In addition to the Kevin Bryce series Deborah Valentine has been the editor of a number of niche-market journals and is a prolific writer of articles, screenplays and a new series of novels with a supernatural theme.

Donald MacKenzie

Donald MacKenzie (1908-1994) was born in Ontario, Canada, and educated in England, Canada and Switzerland. For twenty-five years MacKenzie lived by crime in many countries. 'I went to jail,' he wrote, 'if not with depressing regularity, too often for my liking.' His last sentences were five years in the United States and three years in England, running consecutively. He began writing and selling stories when in American jail. 'I try to do exactly as I like as often as possible and I don't think I'm either psychopathic, a wayward boy, a problem of our time, a charming rogue. Or ever was.'He had a wife, Estrela, and a daughter, and they divided their time between England, Portugal, Spain and Austria.

Dorothy Uhnak

A native New Yorker, born and raised in the Bronx, Dorothy Uhnak (1930-2006) attended the City College of New York and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice before becoming one of the New York Police Departments first female recruits in 1953. She wrote a memoir detailing her experiences, Police Woman, before creating the semi-autobiographical character of Christie Opara, who features in The Bait, The Witness and The Ledger. Opara is the only woman on the District Attoney's Special Investigations Squad, and applies the same cool, methodical approach to hunting down criminals as she does to raising a child on her own and navigating complex relationships with her colleagues. During her 14 years in the NYPD Uhnak was promoted three times and twice awarded medals for services 'above and beyond'; she also earned the department's highest commendation, the Outstanding Police Duty Bar. Her writing was equally highly regarded: The Bait was widely praised by critics, and won the Edgar Award for Best First Mystery of 1968. Dorothy Uhnak died in Greenport, New York, and is survived by her daughter Tracy.

Ed McBain

Ed McBain (1926-2005) was born Salvatore Lombino in New York. He changed his name to Evan Hunter and under that name is known as the author of The Blackboard Jungle and as the writer of the screenplay for Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds. The 87th Precinct series numbers over fifty novels. McBain was a Grand Master of the Mystery Writers of America and was one of three American writers to be awarded the CWA Diamond Dagger for lifetime achievement.

Elizabeth Ferrars

One of the most distinguished crime writers of her generation, Elizabeth Ferrars (1907-1995) was born in Rangoon and came to Britain at the age of six. She was a pupil at Bedales school between 1918 and 1924, studied journalism at London University and published her first crime novel, Give a Corpse a Bad Name, in 1940, the year that she met her second husband, academic Robert Brown. Highly praised by critics, her brand of intelligent, gripping mysteries beloved by readers, she wrote over seventy novels and was also published (as E. X. Ferrars) in the States, where she was equally popular. Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine described her as as 'the writer who may be the closest of all to Christie in style, plotting and general milieu', and the Washington Post called her 'a consummate professional in clever plotting, characterization and atmosphere'. She was a founding member of the Crime Writers' Association, who, in the early 1980s, gave her a lifetime achievement award.

Erle Stanley Gardner

Born in Malden, Massachusetts, Erle Stanley Gardner (1889-1970) left school in 1909 and attended Valparaiso University School of Law in Indiana for just one month before he was suspended for focusing more on his hobby of boxing than his academic studies. Soon after, he settled in California, where he taught himself the law and passed the state bar exam in 1911. The practise of law never held much interest for him, however, apart from as it pertained to trial strategy, and in his spare time he began to write for the pulp magazines that gave Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler their start. Not long after the publication of his first novel, The Case of the Velvet Claws, featuring Perry Mason, he gave up his legal practice to write full time. He had one daughter, Grace, with his first wife, Natalie, from whom he later separated. In 1968 Gardner married his long-term secretary, Agnes Jean Bethell, whom he professed to be the real 'Della Street', Perry Mason's sole (although unacknowledged) love interest. He was one of the most successful authors of all time and at the time of his death, in Temecula, California in 1970, is said to have had 135 million copies of his books in print in America alone.

Evan Hunter

Evan Hunter was born in New York City in 1926. He was widely recognised as one of America's most popular novelists, as well as a successful writer for television and cinema whose credits include the screenplay for Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds. As Ed McBain, Evan became one of the most illustrious names in crime fiction. He was a holder of the Mystery Writers of America¿s coveted Grand Master Award. Evan died in June 2005 at the age of 79.

Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert (1920-86) was born in Tacoma, Washington and worked as a reporter and later editor of a number of West Coast newspapers before becoming a full-time writer. His first SF story was published in 1952 but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication in Analog of 'Dune World' and 'The Prophet of Dune' that were amalgamated in the novel Dune in 1965.

Gavin Lyall

Gavin Lyall (1932-2003) was born in Birmingham, UK and, after serving as a pilot in the RAF, read English at Cambridge and then worked as a journalist for the Picture Post, the BBC and The Sunday Times. He published his first novel, The Wrong Side of the Sky, in 1961. His other books include The Most Dangerous Game and The Secret Servant. He was married to the writer and journalist Katharine Whitehorn.

Gene Wolfe

Gene Wolfe (1931 -) Gene Wolfe was born in New York in 1931 and raised in Texas. After serving in the Korean War he graduated in mechanical engineering from the University of Houston and worked in engineering until becoming an editor of a trade periodical, Plant Engineering, in 1972. Since retiring from this post in 1984, he has written full-time. The author of over three dozen award-wining novels and story collections, he is regarded as one of modern fantasy's most important writers. His best-known work, the four volume far-future Book of the New Sun, won the World Fantasy, BSFA, Nebula, British Fantasy and John W. Campbell memorial Awards. He has won the World Fantasy Award four times for his novels and collections and the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award for his extraordinary body of work. Gene Wolfe lives in Illinois with his wife, Rosemary.

George R.R. Martin

George R.R. Martin published his first story in 1971 and quickly rose to prominence, winning four HUGO and two NEBULA Awards in quick succession before he turned his attention to fantasy with the historical horror novel FEVRE DREAM, now a Fantasy Masterwork. Since then he has won every major award in the fields of fantasy, SF and horror. His magnificent epic saga A Song of Ice and Fire is redefining epic fantasy for a new generation, and is the basis for the hit HBO series GAME OF THRONES. George R.R. Martin lives in New Mexico.Read more at http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/martin_george_r_r

Guy Cullingford

Constance Lindsay Dowdy (1907-2000) began her career writing poems and articles for several periodicals before her first detective novel, Murder with Relish, was published in 1948. Her publisher subsequently convinced her to adopt the pseudonym Guy Cullingford, under which all her ensuing novels were written. Her most celebrated title, Post Mortem, was published in 1953 and received wide critical acclaim. Her identity was finally unmasked after being accepted into The Detection Club, the CWA and the Writers' Guild of Great Britain.