Larry Niven - Ringworld - Orion Publishing Group

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Ringworld

By Larry Niven

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

Return to the classical hard-science fiction of the kind popular in the Golden Age

Pierson's puppeteers, strange, three-legged, two-headed aliens, have discovered an immense structure in a hitherto unexplored part of the universe. Frightened of meeting the builders of such a structure, the puppeteers set about assembling a team consisting of two humans, a puppeteer and a kzin, an alien not unlike an eight-foot-tall, red-furred cat, to explore it. The artefact is a vast circular ribbon of matter, some 180 million miles across, with a sun at its centre - the Ringworld. But the expedition goes disastrously wrong when the ship crashlands and its motley crew faces a trek across thousands of miles of the Ringworld's surface.

Biographical Notes

Larry Niven was born in California in 1938 and studied mathematics at Washburn University, Kansas. His first published science-fiction story was ¿The Coldest Place¿ in 1964 and he immediately established himself as a significant figure in the science-fiction world, winning four Hugos for short fiction. Ringworld is the most important novel in his future history, Tales of Known Space sequence. He has also collaborated, most notably with Jerry Pournelle on The Mote in God¿s Eye, Oath of Fealty, Inferno, Lucifer¿s Hammer and Footfall.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780575077027
  • Publication date: 09 Jun 2005
  • Page count: 288
  • Imprint: Gateway

Doris Piserchia

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Edgar Rice Burroughs

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Joe Hill is a recipient of the Ray Bradbury Fellowship and the winner of the A.E. Coppard Long Fiction Prize, William Crawford, World Fantasy, British Fantasy, Bram Stoker and International Horror Guild Awards. His short fiction has appeared in literary, mystery and horror collections and magazines in Britain and America.For more information, visit www.joehillfiction.com, visit joehillsthrills.tumblr.com, or follow @Joe_Hill on twitter.