Iain Ballantyne - Hunter Killers - Orion Publishing Group

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    • ISBN:9781409139010
    • Publication date:21 Aug 2014

Hunter Killers

The Dramatic Untold Story of the Royal Navy's Most Secret Service

By Iain Ballantyne

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HUNTER KILLER: a submarine designed to pursue and attack enemy submarines and surface ships using torpedoes.

HUNTER KILLER: a submarine designed to pursue and attack enemy submarines and surface ships using torpedoes.

HUNTER KILLERS will follow the careers of four daring British submarine captains who risked their lives to keep the rest of us safe, their exploits consigned to the shadows until now. Their experiences encompass the span of the Cold War, from voyages in WW2-era submarines under Arctic ice to nuclear-powered espionage missions in Soviet-dominated seas.

There are dangerous encounters with Russian spy ships in UK waters and finally, as the communist facade begins to crack, they hold the line against the Kremlin's oceanic might, playing a leading role in bringing down the Berlin Wall. It is the first time they have spoken out about their covert lives in the submarine service.

This is the dramatic untold story of Britain's most-secret service.

Biographical Notes

Iain Ballantyne has been on both ends of a submarine attack. At the close of the Cold War he was aboard a warship forced to take evasive action in the Barents Sea when a Russian submarine launched a torpedo. He has also sailed under the waves aboard a nuclear-powered attack submarine, at one stage using the periscope to view potential targets during a combat exercise. A one-time London-based defence and diplomatic correspondent for a national news agency, Iain has contributed to coverage of naval and military issues in the SUNDAY TELEGRAPH, SCOTLAND ON SUNDAY, MAXIM and FOCUS, as well as prestigious publications published on behalf of NATO and the Royal Navy.

http://www.iainballantyne.com/

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  • ISBN: 9781409144205
  • Publication date: 12 Sep 2013
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Orion
an exciting, thought-provoking and very instructive book, most strongly recommended — SCUTTLEBUTT
Ballantyne has written an excellent book, presenting many exciting and never before told stories from British submariners who served during the Cold War...it is surely one of the most enthralling of Cold War submarine thrillers. — Cem Devrim Yaylali, WARSHIPS INTERNATIONAL FLEET REVIEW
Ballantyne has persuaded former submarine captains to share not only their stories about life aboard what German wartime submariners called "iron coffins", but also some of the largely unknown details of their deployment, including their crucial role in the Cold War. — DAILY EXPRESS
I've found no other book that delves so comprehensively into the underwater battle space during those tense years. — Julian Stockwin, Author of The Kydd Series
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