Dan Kavanagh - Fiddle City - Orion Publishing Group

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    • ISBN:9781409150213
    • Publication date:12 Feb 2015

Fiddle City

By Dan Kavanagh

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There's suspicion, smuggling and shady goings-on galore in the second novel in Dan Kavanagh's darkly humorous series, featuring bisexual private detective Duffy.

There's suspicion, smuggling and shady goings-on galore in the second novel in Dan Kavanagh's darkly humorous series, featuring bisexual private detective Duffy.

Everyone knows a bit of petty theft goes on in the freight business at Heathrow - it is fiddle city, after all. But things have gone beyond a joke for Roy Hendrick and he suspects someone who works for him is helping themselves to more than they should. That's when he sets Duffy on the case.

A bisexual ex-policeman, Duffy runs a struggling security firm, has an obsessive attitude to cleanliness and can often be found propping up the bar at the Alligator. Duffy agrees to work for Hendrick and goes undercover to try and root out the culprit.

But things aren't all they're cracked up to be. What's the story behind the imperious HR manager Mrs Boseley with her permanently frosty demeanour? And is Hendrick really as honest as he claims to be? Duffy's up to his neck in it.

Biographical Notes

Dan Kavanagh was born in County Sligo in 1946. Having devoted his adolescence to truancy, venery and petty theft, he left home at seventeen and signed on as a deckhand on a Liberian tanker. After jumping ship at Montevideo, he roamed across the Americas taking a variety of jobs: he was a steer-wrestler, a waiter-on-roller-skates at a drive-in eatery in Tucson, and a bouncer in a gay bar in San Francisco. He is currently working in London at jobs he declines to specify, and lives in north Islington.

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  • ISBN: 9781409150220
  • Publication date: 28 Aug 2014
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Orion
'Rough, tough, ultra-masculine and rather revolting. No wonder so many (other) people loved them.' — LITERARY REVIEW
'FIDDLE CITY is a witty, swift, smart slice of London hardboiled pastiche.' — SUNDAY HERALD
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