Henry Marsh - Admissions - Orion Publishing Group

Time remaining

  • -- days
  • -- hours
  • -- minutes
  • -- seconds
Other Formats
  • Hardback £16.99
    More information
    • ISBN:9781474603867
    • Publication date:04 May 2017
  • E-Book £P.O.R.
    More information
    • ISBN:9781474603881
    • Publication date:04 May 2017
  • Paperback £8.99
    More information
    • ISBN:9781474603874
    • Publication date:17 May 2018

Admissions

A Life in Brain Surgery

By Henry Marsh
Read by Henry Marsh

  • Downloadable audio file
  • £P.O.R.

A provocative and heartfelt new book written and narrated by the brain surgeon and bestselling author of DO NO HARM.

Henry Marsh has spent a lifetime operating on the surgical frontline. There have been exhilarating highs and devastating lows, but his love for the practice of neurosurgery has never wavered. Prompted by his retirement from his full-time job in the NHS, and through his continuing work in Nepal and Ukraine, Henry has been forced to reflect more deeply about what forty years spent handling the human brain has taught him.

Moving between encounters with patients in his London hospital, to those he treats in the more extreme circumstances of his work abroad, Henry faces up to the overwhelming burden of responsibility that can come with trying to reduce human suffering. Unearthing memories of his early days as a medical student, and the experiences that shaped him as a young surgeon, he explores the difficulties of a profession that deals in probabilities rather than certainties, and where the consequences of your decisions alter not just the life of a patient but also of those around them. The overpowering human urge to prolong life can often come at a great cost to those who are living it, and to those who love them.

In this searing, provocative and deeply personal memoir, the bestselling author of Do No Harm finds new purpose in his own life as he approaches the end of his professional career and a fresh understanding of what matters to us all in the end.

Written and read by Dr Henry Marsh

(p) 2017 Orion Publishing Group

Biographical Notes

Henry Marsh was one of Britain's foremost brain surgeons, and worked as Consultant Neurosurgeon at Atkinson Morley's/St George's Hospital in London for thirty years. Since retiring from full-time work in the NHS, he has continued to operate and lecture abroad, in Nepal, Albania and Ukraine. His prize-winning memoir, DO NO HARM, was a SUNDAY TIMES and NEW YORK TIMES bestseller. He has been the subject of two award-winning documentary films, YOUR LIFE IN THEIR HANDS and THE ENGLISH SURGEON. He was made a CBE in 2010.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781409166788
  • Publication date: 04 May 2017
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Orion
Sensational...Marsh is curmudgeonly, unflinching, clinical, competitive, often contemptuous and consistently curious. In Admissions he scrubs up just as well the second time around and continues to revel in his joyous candour — THE SUNDAY TIMES
Superb...a eulogy to surgery and a study of living. I didn't want this book to end. Henry Marsh is part of a growing canon of superb modern medical writers...whose storytelling and prose are transportative...His timing is also impeccable...His sentences, too, feel like works of the finest craftmanship, made with the love that goes into both his woodwork and surgery — Jessamy Calkin, DAILY TELEGRAPH
Marsh is, given his profession, a surprisingly emotional man, likably so. His account of his younger self that threads through this compulsive book is a Bildungsroman in itself. He is also a fine writer and storyteller, and a nuanced observer — Tim Adams, OBSERVER
The maverick is back, even more blunt and irascible, with tales of thrilling, high-wire operations at medicine's unconquered frontier, woven through with personal memoir...Marsh in full spate is quite magnificent...a master of tar-black, deadpan humour — Melanie Reid, THE TIMES
Disarmingly frank storytelling. [Marsh] is, in spite of himself, hugely likeable...his reflections on death and dying equal those in Atul Gawande's excellent Being Mortal — ECONOMIST
Epigramatically balanced and almost brutally candid...Admissions offers a reprise of many of [Do No Harm's] virtues, from the elegance of the writing to the undiminished sense of wonder at the complexity of the brain — Tom Sutcliffe, MAIL ON SUNDAY
Admissions is a humbling read, in which neurosurgeon Henry Marsh shares fascinating facts learnt during his 40-year career as a brain surgeon. He has a deep humanity that resonates throughout — GOOD HOUSEKEEPING
Transgressive, wry and confessional, sporadically joyful and occasionally doleful. It is in many ways a more revealing work than Do No Harm, and the revelations it offers are a good deal more personal...Marsh skilfully articulates the subtleties and frustrations of neurosurgery - but there is a deeper examination of death, and an angrier exposition of the shameful betrayal of the NHS by successive generations of politicians...honesty is abundantly apparent here - a quality as rare and commendable in elite surgeons as one suspects it is in memoirists...elegaic but consistently entertaining — Gavin Francis, GUARDIAN
An enthralling book, unputdownable...it is an exhilarating, even thrilling read, a glimpse into a world we hope we may never have to enter — THE ARTS DESK
Fascinating...Marsh paints a vivid picture of the pressures imposed on a surgeon who is quite literally at the cutting edge of modern medicine — William Hartston, DAILY EXPRESS
[Marsh] is wise and insightful about the balance and confidence, truth and uncertainty faced by doctors...his insights about life, death and professional purpose are irresistible — Hannah Beckerman, SUNDAY EXPRESS
I particularly relished his descriptions of the anatomy of the brain itself, as well as his can-do accounts of freeing cancerous masses from their baroque architecture - but I enjoyed (if this is the correct word) still more his willingness to delve as fearlessly into his own, troubled being ... accounts of highly undoctorly behaviour that nonetheless confirms Marsh as the man I would most like to have prying open my skull. Perhaps most disarming of all is Marsh's frankness about his own fears of growing older and dying ... should be distributed to every care home in Britain — Will Self, NEW STATESMAN
A truly extraordinary account. Henry Marsh's honesty and simple pragmatism underpin an amazing life of tantalising curiosity and contact with the most complex organ in the known universe. I often wonder about the physical structure of my own brain, about the bits that work and the bits that don't. I wonder at the minutiae, those microscopic fronds, the fragile fabric of jelly that defines me, and here is a man who has seen it, tweaked it, repaired it and yet still doesn't know it. It is tempting to try and find a magic in the mystery, but in fact this is a celebration of the magnificence of the brain — Chris Packham
Extraordinary...both exhilarating and alarming...harrowing but fascinating...It is a privilege to dance with [Marsh] through these engrossing, revealing pages — Libby Purves, DAILY MAIL
Emerging from his own brusque acceptance of the inevitability of suffering and death is a deep compassion for his patients and their families. It is fascinating to have [the brain] dissected, and with such psychological and clinical penetration, by someone for whom it is horribly untheoretical and immediate — Jane O'Grady, LITERARY REVIEW
With charm and black humour ... [Marsh] claims that "handling the brain tells you nothing about life - other than to be dismayed by its fragility", yet few memoirs have more sagacity. Admissions forces the reader to confront death, why we fear it and why we cling on — Rosamund Urwin, INDEPENDENT i paper
Wonderful...eloquent...a testament to the tenacity of the human spirit — Adrian Woolfson, FINANCIAL TIMES
Marsh is now almost as celebrated a writer as he is a brain surgeon. This, a sequel to his best-selling memoir Do No Harm, is a frank and provocative meditation on failures in living and dying as he approaches the end of his career in medicine — MAIL ON SUNDAY Summer Books
Henry Marsh's Do No Harm was an award-winning and revelatory look at the daily dilemmas of being a neurosurgeon. This follow-up is a humorous, irascible and opinionated look at his early life, his long career in the NHS and his retirement. Candid and curmudgeonly — Robbie Millen, THE TIMES Summer Books
[Marsh] is clearly a brilliant neurosurgeon, and a wonderful writer — Helen Thomson, NEW SCIENTIST
This thoughtful account charting retirement and surgical work in Nepal and Ukraine brims with insights - not only on the fraught nexus of scalpel and brain, but on the complexities of ageing and the pleasures of beekeeping, tree-planting and carpentry — Barbara Kiser, NATURE
Marsh's second book is a fine undertaking... More reflective than Do No Harm... Admissions is an attempt to place in context the professional life of that first book. He is, at times, disarmingly honest... There are deeply moving moments... On end-of-life care and euthanasia, Marsh is measured and convincing — George Berridge, TLS
Marsh's commitment to truth-telling makes this a genuinely humbling as well as fascinating read. And, like Do No Harm, it leaves a deep and permanent impression — Stephanie Cross, THE LADY
The eloquent author of Do No Harm pulls no punches in this moving memoir, in which he reflects candidly on his life, experiences in medicine at home and in impoverished countries, the prospect of retirement ... and death — HUMAN GIVENS JOURNAL

His descriptions of his work there [in Nepal and Ukraine] demonstrate again his gift with both scalpel and pen ...
disarmingly self-effacing and honest

— WASHINGTON POST
It feels like a privilege to spend time with Marsh, an exemplary person with lambent emotions whose fearsome skills and hidden fears are a reminder of how exultant, sad, ardent, and swift life really is — Joshua Rothman, New Yorker
Orion

My Mad Dad

Robyn Hollingworth
Authors:
Robyn Hollingworth

Inadvertent cross dressing Attempted murder Jail break A waltz at a funeral A hernia the size of GuernseyHeartbreaking and darkly comic, these are the moments that litter the messy road from cared-for to carer, a journey that Robyn Hollingworth finds herself on when she's only twenty-five years old. Leaving London to return home to rural South Wales, Robyn finds that it's her old life - same teddy bears resting on her pillow, their bodies tucked under the duvet; same view of the garages behind which she'd had her first cigarette and first kiss - but so much has changed. Her dad, the proud, charmingly intelligent, self-made man who made people laugh, was in the grip of early onset Alzheimer's. His brilliant mind, which saw him building power stations and literally bringing light into the lives of others, had succumbed to darkness. As Robyn settles back in the rhythms of life in the rain-soaked vast Welsh valleys, she keeps a diary charting her journey as the dad she knew disappears before her eyes. Lyrical, poignant and with flashes of brilliant humour, My Mad Dad explores how in helping others we can heal ourselves. 'At some point the cared for become the carers...this isn't a shame and it isn't a tragedy and it isn't a chore. It is an honour. To be able to return the gift of love that someone bestows upon you is a gift in itself. This is a story of caring...'

Orion

Heal Me

Julia Buckley
Authors:
Julia Buckley

Julia Buckley needs a miracle. Like a third of the UK population, she has a chronic pain condition. According to her doctors, it can't be cured. She doesn't believe them. She does believe in miracles, though. It's just a question of tracking one down.Julia's search for a cure takes her on a global quest, exploring the boundaries between science, psychology and faith with practitioners on the fringes of conventional, traditional and alternative medicine. From neuroplastic brain rewiring in San Francisco to medical marijuana in Colorado, Haitian vodou rituals to Brazilian 'spiritual surgery', she's willing to try anything. Can miracles happen? And more importantly, what happens next if they do?Raising vital questions about the modern medical system, this is also a story about identity in a system historically skewed against 'hysterical' female patients, and the struggle to retain a sense of self under the medical gaze. Heal Me explains why modern medicine's current approach to chronic pain is failing patients. It explores the importance of faith, hope and cynicism, and examines our relationships with our doctors, our beliefs and ourselves.

W&N

Goodbye Europe

Various
Authors:
Various
W&N

From Here to Eternity

Caitlin Doughty, Landis Blair
Contributors:
Caitlin Doughty, Landis Blair
Trapeze

Dear Cancer, Love Victoria

Victoria Derbyshire
Authors:
Victoria Derbyshire
W&N

My Father's Wake

Kevin Toolis
Authors:
Kevin Toolis

Death is a whisper in the Anglo-Saxon world. But on a remote island, off the coast of County Mayo, death has a louder voice. Along with reports of incoming Atlantic storms, the local radio station runs a thrice-daily roll-call of the recently departed. The islanders have no fear of death. They go in great numbers, often with young children, to wake with their dead. They keep vigil through the night with the corpse and share in the sorrow of the bereaved. They bear the burden of the coffin on their shoulders and dig the grave with their own hands. The living and the dead remain bound together in the Irish Wake - the oldest rite of humanity.For twenty years writer and filmmaker Kevin Toolis hunted death in famine, war and plague across the world before finding the answer to his quest on the island of his forebears. In this beautifully written and highly original memoir, he gives an intimate, eye-witness account of the death and wake of his father, and explores the wider history of the Irish Wake. With an uplifting, positive message at its heart, My Father's Wake celebrates the spiritual depth of the Irish Wake and shows how we too can find a better way to deal with our mortality, by living and loving in the acceptance of death.

Orion

A Question of Blood

Ian Rankin
Authors:
Ian Rankin
W&N

Outside the Asylum

Lynne Jones
Authors:
Lynne Jones

What happens if the psychiatric hospital in which you have lived for ten years is bombed and all the staff run away? What is it like to be a twelve-year-old and see all your family killed in front of you? Is it true that almost everyone caught up in a disaster is likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder? What can mental health professionals do to help? How does one stay neutral and impartial in the face of genocide? Why would a doctor support military intervention?Outside the Asylum is Lynne Jones's personal exploration of of humanitarian psychiatry and the changing world of international relief; a memoir of more than twenty-five years as a practising psychiatrist in war and disaster zones around the world. From her training in one of Britain's last asylums, to treating traumatised soldiers in Gorazde after the Bosnian war, helping families who lost everything in the earthquake in Haiti, and learning from traditional healers in Sierra Leone, Lynne has worked with extraordinary people in extraordinary situations. This is a book that shines a light on the world of humanitarian aid, and that shows us the courage and resilience of the people who have to live, work and love in some of the most frightening situations in the world.

W&N

Blue

John Sutherland
Authors:
John Sutherland

A Sunday Times top-five bestsellerA searingly honest memoir of life, policing and falling apart'Every contact leaves a trace'John Sutherland joined the Met in 1992, having dreamed of being a police officer since his teens. Rising quickly through the ranks, and compelled by the opportunity to make a real difference to people's lives, he worked across the capital, experiencing first-hand the enormous satisfaction as well as the endless trauma that a life in blue can bring.There were remarkable, career-defining moments: commanding armed sieges, saving lives and helping to take dangerous people off the streets. But for every case with a happy ending, there were others that ended in desperate sadness.In early 2013, John suffered a major breakdown and consequent battle with crippling depression. After a career spent racing to be the first at the scene of crimes and catastrophes, he found himself in pieces, unable to put one foot in front of the other.Blue is a memoir of crime and calamity, of adventure and achievement, of friendship and failure, of laughter and loss, of the best and the worst of humanity, of serious illness and slow recovery. With searing honesty, it offers an immensely moving and personal insight into what it is to be a police officer in Britain today.

Orion

Get A Life

Rosie Bray, Richard Mackney
Authors:
Rosie Bray, Richard Mackney
W&N

Shrinks

Jeffrey A. Lieberman, Ogi Ogas
Authors:
Jeffrey A. Lieberman, Ogi Ogas

A world-renowned psychiatrist reveals the fascinating story of psychiatry's origins, demise and redemption. Psychiatry has come a long way since the days of chaining 'lunatics' in cold cells and parading them as freakish marvels before a gaping public. But, as Jeffrey Lieberman reveals in his extraordinary and eye-opening book, the path to legitimacy for 'the black sheep of medicine' has been anything but smooth. In SHRINKS, Dr Lieberman traces the field from its birth as a mystic pseudo-science through its adolescence as a cult of 'shrinks' to its late blooming maturity since the Second World War as a science-driven profession that saves lives. With fascinating case studies and portraits of the luminaries of the field, from Sigmund Freud to Eric Kandel, SHRINKS is a gripping and illuminating read. It is also an urgent call-to-arms to dispel the stigma surrounding mental illness and to start treating it as a disease rather than a state of mind.

W&N

Do No Harm

Henry Marsh
Authors:
Henry Marsh
Gateway

The Wine of Violence

James Morrow
Authors:
James Morrow

Marooned on the planet Quetzalia after their ship clashed with the irresistable force of gravity, Day One In Paradise is not quite the blissful Utopia fact-finding Nearthlings Francis Lostwax and Burne Newman were expecting.Tropical fronds turn out to be brain-eating Neurovores who decimate the rest of the scientists' crew, and a sweeping, majestic river becomes a bubbling cauldron of caustic 'noctus' or liquified hate.Abandoning their craft, the two scientists flee to the Quetzalians, a peace-loving race guided by the precepts of the Ancient Mexicans. Together they vow to rid the planet of the evil Neurovores.But the technology-free Quetzalians demand that the Nearthlings destroy their machines and with them their lifeline back to the planet New Earth...

Gateway

The Primitive

E.C. Tubb
Authors:
E.C. Tubb
Gateway

Skylark Three

E.E. 'Doc' Smith
Authors:
E.E. 'Doc' Smith

In this exhilarating sequel to The Skylark of Space, momentous danger again stalks genius inventor and interplanetary adventurer Dr. Richard Seaton. Seaton's allies on the planet Kondal are suffering devastating attacks by the forces of the Third Planet. Even worse, the menacing and contemptuous Fenachrones are threatening to conquer the galaxy and wipe out all who oppose them. And don't forget the dastardly machinations of Seaton's arch-nemesis, DuQuesne, who embarks on a nefarious mission of his own. Against such vile foes and impossible odds, how is victory possible?

Gateway

The Galactiad

E.C. Tubb
Authors:
E.C. Tubb

The things from beyond the Milky Way galaxy found the intelligent races of our universe amusingly slight. To them, possessors of vast cosmic power, the strivings of various humanoids to outdo each other were a source of contemptuous entertainment.They established a contest between the worlds. It would be an Olympiad of the whole galaxy - a Galactiad. Let these puny interstellar intelligences meet each other in contest. Pit one against the other - and let the losers beware!Earth had its team - a mixed group of powerful athletes and genius scientists. Because other worlds did not always believe in the ideal of good sportsmanship, they had to confront the reality. Win at all costs . . . or goodbye to humanity!

Orion

The Song of Silver Frond

Catherine Lim
Authors:
Catherine Lim

An exotic, beguiling love story set in 1950s Singapore.'It was a special protection from the gods that Silver Frond's beauty manifested itself only after the barbarians had left? A beautiful child-woman, in that intriguing in-between stage when people could not tell where innocence ended and seductiveness began, and were charmed by both.'One morning in Singapore more than fifty years ago, The Venerable One - a wealthy, respected, handsome Chinese patriarch, head of a large household of three wives and many children and grandchildren - takes a walk by a cemetery. There, a young village egg-seller, Silver Frond, is amusing herself with a comic song-and-dance act based on popular gossip - about him. The meeting instantly changes their lives.Is he not too old? Is she not too young? Are their worlds not too far apart? With characteristic verve and wit, Catherine Lim traces the struggles of an unusual couple through the jungle of human quandaries and predicaments created by the force of tradition, and celebrates the ultimate triumph of an even more extraordinary force - love.

W&N

Age Of Empire: 1875-1914

Eric Hobsbawm
Authors:
Eric Hobsbawm

THE AGE OF EMPIRE is a book about the strange death of the nineteenth century, the world made by and for liberal middle classes in the name of universal progress and civilisation. It is about hopes realised which turned into fears: an era of unparalleled peace engendering an era of unparalleled war; revolt and revolution emerging on the outskirts of society; a time of profound identity crisis for bourgeois classes, among new and sudden mass labour movements which rejected capitalism and new middle classes which rejected liberalism. It is about world empires built and held with almost contemptuous ease by small bodies of Europeans which were to last barely a human lifetime, and a European domination of world history, which was never more confident than at the moment it was about to disappear for ever. It is about Queen Victoria, Madame Curie and the Kodak Girl, and the novel social world of cloth caps, golf clubs and brassieres, about Nietzsche, Carnegie, William Morris and Dreyfus, about politically ineffective terrorists, one of whom, to his and everyone's surprise, started a world war.With the AGE OF EMPIRE, Eric Hobsbawm, Britain's leading historian of the left, brings to a dazzling climax his brilliant interpretative history of 'the long nineteenth century'.

W&N

The Human Brain

Susan Greenfield
Authors:
Susan Greenfield
Gollancz

Flowers For Algernon

Daniel Keyes
Authors:
Daniel Keyes