E. C. Eliott - Kemlo and the End of Time - Orion Publishing Group

Kemlo and the End of Time

By E. C. Eliott

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  • £P.O.R.

An SF Gateway eBook: bringing the classics to the future.

Everyone knows the story of the Marie Celeste. Kemlo and Kerowski hardly expected to find an aerial Marie Celeste adrift in the void.

But caught, with others, in the worst astral storm of their experience, they had other things to think about for the moment. And after that there was yet another, one still more important...

Biographical Notes

Reginald Alec Martin (1908-1971)
E. C. Eliott is the best-known pseudonym of British writer Reginald Alec Martin, who wrote under a number of different names. Born in South London, Martin began working at the age of thirteen and had numerous varied occupations throughout his life, including cowboy, gold prospector and wild-horse trader. He began writing full-time as a career at the end of World War Two and wrote well over a hundred and fifty books in total, including about sixty children's novels. The titles from Martin's children's sf series Kemlo had a powerful emotional impact on many of their youthful British readers, helping shape the thoughts of a generation towards sf. He died on 27th June 1971 in Haywards Heath, Sussex.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473212336
  • Publication date: 25 Aug 2016
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Gateway
Gateway

Kemlo and the Purple Dawn

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott

Earth is faced with annihilation by the Purple Dawn - effect of the cosmic fall-out from the swirling planet-in-the-making Polarthanus.Kemlo and his Space Scouts are out in the void, towing a crippled space ship with their scooters, when suddenly the crisis is upon them. The space-born boys have to make a decision: if they take drastic action will it avert the danger - or will they blow up Earth, the Satellite Belts and themselves?

Gateway

Kemlo and the Zombie Men

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott
Gateway

Kemlo and the Space Men

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott
Gateway

Kemlo and the Space Invaders

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott

When Jod Wyler and his gang of Whirleebirds decided to invade the new satellite, where now lived Kemlo, Kerowski, Krillie and all our other friends from Satellite K, there were one or two points which he entirely overlooked.One or two very important points...

Gateway

Kemlo and the Masters of Space

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott

As Kartin says, 'You can't have houses in space.' What then are those mysterious objects that have suddenly appeared far out on the planet routes? What connection do they have with 'the Shy Six Hundred', as Kemlo calls them, those strange, Earth-born visitors to Satellite K who are so chary of having their photographs taken?Kemlo and his Space Scouts decide that the time has come for a little detective work and the boys are soon hot on the trail - a trail which is to lead them from the comfort and security of the satellite to a battle to the death twenty million miles out into the void.

Gateway

Kemlo and the Crazy Planet

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott

Kemlo and his friend Krillie, who have set out from Satellite Belt K on a Space trip, find themselves off course and eventually land upon a planet about which very little is known except that odd things happen there, so that it has become known as the Crazy Planet.The people upon it, whose language is laughter, are friendly; but others, from Earth, are also marooned upon it, and they are very far from friendly, not only to the laughing People but to Kemlo and Krillie too. Their wicked plans, however, are foiled by Kemlo, who is later responsible for helping his new friends against a mass attack of the murderous wood beasts...

Gateway

Kemlo and the Zones of Silence

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott

Kemlo and Krillie, together with Krillie's sister Krinsetta, set out for a visit to S Belt in Kemlo's space scooter. They are attacked by three boys from S Belt, who kidnap Krinsetta. Kemlo gives chase, and both his and the other craft are forced down, off course, on to the Zones of Silence, part of a large area known as the Dead World where the slightest whisper is magnified into a roar...The inhabitants of the Zones have no audible form of speech, but use instead a highly developed system of thought transference. These creatures are friendly, but too friendly: they attempt to drug the minds of visitors with thought impulses compelling them to stay on the Zones. Kemlo is able to resist this powerful impulse, but...

Gateway

Kemlo and the Sky Horse

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott
Gateway

Kemlo and the Martian Ghosts

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott

Kemlo, with two other boys from Satellite K, are allowed to accompany a small research team setting off to reconnoiter Deimos, a moonlet of Mars.The research ship has a smooth journey until it encounters a fierce astral storm, but eventually lands safely on Deimos - where some peculiar magnetic forces put all the instruments out of action.From then on the suspense is terrific. Kemlo and his friends find their way barred by a moving wall of lighted shapes and, scattered, are apparently attacked by transparent figures etched in vivid light. Up to the very end the doubt remains: will the power of the Martian Ghosts triumph or be broken?

Gateway

Kemlo and the Space Lanes

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott
Gateway

Kemlo and the Craters of the Moon

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott
Gateway

Kemlo and the Star Men

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott
Gateway

Kemlo and the Gravity Rays

E. C. Eliott
Authors:
E. C. Eliott

Earth-born men had been able to travel to Space, but till now Space-born men had not been able to travel to Earth.It was left for Space-born boys - Kemlo, and his friends Kerowski and Karten - to blaze this trail.

Barry N. Malzberg

Barry N. Malzberg (1939-) Barry N. Malzberg is an American writer, editor and agent, whose prolific career has spanned numerous genres - most notably crime and science fiction. Malzberg was particularly active in the science fiction scene of the early seventies, although he became disillusioned with the market forces defining the field, and has rarely published SF works since. His most recent activity in the field has been in the form of advice columns for writers in the quarterly magazine of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Barry N. Malzberg has been shortlisted for numerous awards, including the Hugo, Nebula and Philip K. Dick.

Bob Shaw

Bob Shaw (1931 - 1996) Bob Shaw was born in Belfast in 1931. After working in engineering, aircraft design and journalism he became a full time writer in 1975. Among his novels are Orbitsville, A Wreath of Stars, The Ragged Astronauts and his best-known work Other Days, Other Eyes, based on the Nebula Award-nominated 'Light of Other Days', the story that made his reputation. Although his SF novels and stories were for the most part serious, Shaw was well-known in fannish circles for his sense of humour, and his witty 'Serious Scientific Talks' were a favourite of attendees at Eastercons. Bob Shaw won two Hugos and three BSFA Awards. He died in 1996.

Colin Greenland

Born in 1954 and educated at Oxford, Colin Greenland is the author of a number of acclaimed science fiction and fantasy novels, including the BSFA and ARTHUR. C. CLARKE AWARD-winning TAKE BACK PLENTY. He has contributed short stories to many anthologies and magazines as well as reviews of new fiction for the GUARDIAN, the INDEPENDENT, and many other publications. He has also had stories broadcast on BBC Radio 4.

Henry Kuttner

Henry Kuttner (1915 -1958)Henry Kuttner was born in Los Angeles, in 1915. As a young man he worked for the literary agency of his uncle, Laurence D'Orsay, before selling his first story, 'The Graveyard Rats', to Weird Tales in early 1936. In 1940 Kuttner married fellow writer C. L. Moore, whom he met through the 'Lovecraft Circle'", a group of writers and fans who corresponded with H. P. Lovecraft. During the Second World War, they were regular contributors to John W. Campbell's Astounding Science-Fiction, and collaborated for most of the 40's and 50's, publishing primarily under the pseudonyms Lewis Padgett and Lawrence O'Donnell. In 1950 he began studying at the University of Southern California, graduating in 1954. He was working towards his masters degree but died of a heart attack in 1958, before it was completed. For more information see www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/kuttner_henry

J. T. McIntosh

J T McIntosh (1925 - 2008)J. T. McIntosh was the pseudonym used by Scottish writer and journalist James Murdoch MacGregor, under which all of his SF writing appeared (with the exception of a single story). Born in Paisley, Scotland, in 1925, he began publishing science fiction in 1950 with 'The Curfew Tolls', which appeared in John W. Campbell's Astounding Science Fiction magazine. His first novel, World Out of Mind, appeared three years later, and he continued to write novels of interest over the next decade and a half, but ceased publishing work after 1980. He died in 2008.

Jack L. Chalker

Jack L. Chalker (1944 - 2005)Jack Laurence Chalker was born in Baltimore, in 1944. He received an MLA from Johns Hopkins University and taught history and geography for over a decade before becoming a professional writer in 1978. He was active in the fan community from his teens and though he published work as an editor and critic, it is for his fiction that he is best known. He was a prolific author, writing across genres successfully, and was nominated for the Hugo and John W. Campbell New Writer awards, among others. His major work is The Well of Souls sequence, comprising ten books across two series, and featuring the 'godgame' narrative device that was his signature. He died in February, 2005.

Jack Vance

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