Bernard Wolfe - Limbo - Orion Publishing Group

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    • ISBN:9781473212480
    • Publication date:15 Dec 2016
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Limbo

By Bernard Wolfe

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

A forgotten classic by one of the great American writers of the twentieth century, with introductions from Harlan Ellison and David Pringle.

In the aftermath of an atomic war, a new international movement of pacifism has arisen. Multitudes of young men have chosen to curb their aggressive instincts through voluntary amputation - disarmament in its most literal sense.

Those who have undergone this procedure are highly esteemed in the new society. But they have a problem - their prosthetics require a rare metal to function, and international tensions are rising over which countries get the right to mine it . . .

Biographical Notes

Bernard Wolfe (1915-1985) was born in New Haven, Connecticut. He worked as a military correspondent for a number of science magazines during the Second World War, and began to write fiction in 1946. He became best known for his 1952 SF novel Limbo.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473212473
  • Publication date: 15 Dec 2016
  • Page count: 432
  • Imprint: Gollancz

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