John Wyndham - The Chrysalids - Orion Publishing Group

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Books in this series

The Chrysalids

By John Wyndham

  • Hardback
  • £12.99

The disturbing post-apocalyptic masterpiece from the author of THE DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS.

David's father doesn't approve of Angus Morton's unusually large horses, calling them blasphemies against nature. And blasphemies, as everyone knows, should be burned: KEEP PURE THE STOCK OF THE LORD; WATCH THOU FOR THE MUTANT.

Little does he realise that his own son - and his son's cousin Rosalind and their friends - have their own secret aberration which would label them as mutants. And mutants, as everyone knows, should be burned.

But as David and Rosalind grow older it becomes more difficult to conceal their differences from the village elders. Soon they face a choice: wait for eventual discovery - and death - or flee to the terrifying and mutable Badlands . . .

Biographical Notes

John Wyndham (1903-69)
John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris was the son of a barrister, who started writing short stories in 1925. During the war he was in the civil service and then the army. In 1946 he went back to writing stories for publication in the USA and decided to try a modified form of science fiction, which he called 'logical fantasy'. As John Wyndham, he is best-known as the author of The Day of the Triffids, but he wrote many other successful novels including The Kraken Wakes, The Chrysalids and The Midwich Cuckoos (filmed as Village of the Damned).

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473212688
  • Publication date: 09 Jun 2016
  • Page count: 208
  • Imprint: Gollancz
Gollancz

The Midwich Cuckoos

John Wyndham
Authors:
John Wyndham

In the sleepy English village of Midwich, a mysterious silver object appears and all the inhabitants fall unconscious. A day later the object is gone and everyone awakens unharmed - except that all the women in the village are discovered to be pregnant.The resultant children of Midwich do not belong to their parents: all are blonde, all are golden eyed. They grow up too fast and their minds exhibit frightening abilities that give them control over others and brings them into conflict with the villagers, just as a chilling realisation dawns on the world outside . . . The Midwich Cuckoos is the classic tale of aliens in our midst, exploring how we respond when confronted by those who are innately superior to us in every conceivable way.

Gollancz

The Day Of The Triffids

John Wyndham
Authors:
John Wyndham

When Bill Masen wakes up in his hospital bed, he has reason to be grateful for the bandages that covered his eyes the night before. For he finds a population rendered blind and helpless by the spectacular meteor shower that filled the night sky, the evening before. But his relief is short-lived as he realises that a newly-blinded population is now at the mercy of the Triffids. Once, the Triffids were farmed for their oil, their uncanny ability to move and their carnivorous habits well controlled by their human keepers. But now, with humans so vulnerable, they are a potent threat to humanity's survival. It is up to people like Bill, the few who can still see, to carve out a future for the human race . . .

Orion

The Thirteenth Tale

Diane Setterfield
Authors:
Diane Setterfield

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