Margaret St Clair - The Games of Neith - Orion Publishing Group

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The Games of Neith

By Margaret St Clair

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

An SF Gateway eBook: bringing the classics to the future.

Did she hold the key to ecstasy - or to horror?

The people of Gwethym were highly intelligent, rational beings. They worshiped the goddess Neith, not because they believed in such a golden-haired being, but because they recognised the need for religion as a counterbalance to human passions.

So when trouble struck their planet, when they discovered an energy leak which was slowly destroying their world, the Gwethymians turned to science for their answer. If their world was to be saved, the solution must come from the logicians.

Or so they thought, until one day a woman, in the image of their goddess Neith, walked across the waters of the harbour and into their city! Then their trouble was two-fold. Would there be anything left to save of their world if they waited for the scientists? And if they didn't, if they put their trust in this goddess whom logic told them could not even exist, would they just be sealing their doom that much quicker?

Biographical Notes

Margaret St Clair (1911-1995)
Margaret St Clair was an American science fiction writer who wrote mostly under her own name, but published a number of titles under the pseudonyms Idris Seabright and Wilton Hazzard. Born in Hutchinson, Kansas, St Clair had no siblings and recalled her childhood as 'rather a lonely and bookish one'. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1932 and in 1934 she earned a Master of Arts in Greek Classics. Her sf career began with 'Rocket to Limbo' for Fantastic Adventures in November 1946 and by 1950 she had published about 30 more stories. From the outset of her career, St. Clair was aware of her unusual role as a woman writing in a male-dominated field. An article she wrote for Writer's Digest in 1947, about selling stories to the science fiction market, begins: 'Why is science fiction fun to write? At first blush, it doesn't seem attractive, particularly for a woman.' A lifelong supporter of the American Friends Service Committee, she spent her final years at Friends House in Santa Rosa, California. She died in 1995.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473214538
  • Publication date: 27 Apr 2017
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Gateway
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