Paraic O’Donnell - The House on Vesper Sands - Orion Publishing Group

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    • ISBN:9781409166337
    • Publication date:18 Oct 2018
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    • ISBN:9781474600392
    • Publication date:18 Oct 2018

The House on Vesper Sands

By Paraic O’Donnell

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'The most vivid and compelling portrait of late Victorian London since The Crimson Petal and the White' Sarah Perry, author of The Essex Serpent

'Like the love child of Dickens and Conan Doyle, but funnier than both' Liz Nugent, author of Lying in Wait

A story of snow and Spiriters, cops and columnists, wickedness and love in Victorian London.

'The most vivid and compelling portrait of late Victorian London since The Crimson Petal and the White' Sarah Perry, author of The Essex Serpent

'Like the love child of Dickens and Conan Doyle, but funnier than both' Liz Nugent, author of Lying in Wait

'Ladies and gentlemen, the darkness is complete.'

It is the winter of 1893, and in London the snow is falling.

It is falling as Gideon Bliss seeks shelter in a Soho church, where he finds Angie Tatton lying before the altar. His one-time love is at death's door, murmuring about brightness and black air, and about those she calls the Spiriters. In the morning she is gone.

The snow is falling as a seamstress climbs onto a ledge above Mayfair, a mysterious message stitched into her own skin. It is falling as she steadies herself and closes her eyes.

It is falling, too, as her employer, Lord Strythe, vanishes into the night, watched by Octavia Hillingdon, a restless society columnist who longs to uncover a story of real importance.

She and Gideon will soon be drawn into the same mystery, each desperate to save Angie and find out the truth about Lord Strythe. Their paths will cross as the darkness gathers, and will lead them at last to what lies hidden at the house on Vesper Sands.

Biographical Notes

Paraic O'Donnell is a writer of fiction, poetry and criticism. His essays and reviews have appeared in the Guardian, The Spectator, the Irish Times and elsewhere. His first novel, THE MAKER OF SWANS, was named the Amazon Rising Stars Debut of the Month for February 2016 and was shortlisted for the Bord Gáis Energy Irish Book Awards in the Newcomer of the Year category. He lives in Wicklow, Ireland with his wife and two children.

http://paraicodonnell.com | @paraicodonnell

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  • ISBN: 9781474600415
  • Publication date: 18 Oct 2018
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: W&N
The most vivid and compelling portrait of late Victorian London since The Crimson Petal and the White — Sarah Perry, author of THE ESSEX SERPENT
Like the love child of Dickens and Conan Doyle, but funnier than both — Liz Nugent, author of LYING IN WAIT
Rarely does a writer stop you so fully in your tracks — Sunday Independent on THE MAKER OF SWANS
The prose in O'Donnell's first novel is glorious, combining an ear for deep cadences of language with a phenomenal acuity of vision ... O'Donnell is clearly a major talent — GUARDIAN on THE MAKER OF SWANS
Truly bewitching — David Mitchell on THE MAKER OF SWANS
A page-turner in the very best sense of the term ... a deeply pleasurable gothic fantasy — Financial Times on THE MAKER OF SWANS
Lavishly entertaining, strange and captivating — INDEPENDENT on THE MAKER OF SWANS
Enthralling ... a literary feast — Stylist on THE MAKER OF SWANS
Compulsive reading . . . rich, strange, beautiful — Helen Macdonald, author of H IS FOR HAWK on THE MAKER OF SWANS
I devoured this book ... Line by line, Paraic's writing contains some of the most beautifully turned phrasing I've read in a long while — Laura Barnett, author of VERSIONS OF US, on THE MAKER OF SWANS
Mysterious, unsettling and eerily lovely ... Perfect for fans of The Wicked Cometh and The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock. I adored it — Melinda Salisbury, author of THE SIN EATER'S DAUGHTER
An atmospheric, moving, creepy and very funny story with one of the great fictional detectives — Linda Grant, author of THE DARK CIRCLE
Reading this terrific Victorian-set mystery was the most fun I've had in ages. It unfolds so thrillingly and cleverly. Do not miss — The Bookseller, Editor’s Choice
I am giddy with love for The House on Vesper Sands. It is spooky and atmospheric and superbly drawn, absolutely jammed with brilliant characters and so funny — Jenny Landreth, author of SWELL
W&N

The Shadow of the Wind

Carlos Ruiz Zafon
Authors:
Carlos Ruiz Zafon

The international bestseller and modern classic - over 20 million copies sold worldwide'Shadow is the real deal, a novel full of cheesy splendour and creaking trapdoors, a novel where even the subplots have subplots. One gorgeous read' STEPHEN KING'An instant classic' DAILY TELEGRAPHThe Shadow of the Wind is a stunning literary thriller in which the discovery of a forgotten book leads to a hunt for an elusive author who may or may not still be alive...Hidden in the heart of the old city of Barcelona is the 'Cemetery of Lost Books', a labyrinthine library of obscure and forgotten titles that have long gone out of print. To this library, a man brings his 10-year-old son Daniel one cold morning in 1945. Daniel is allowed to choose one book from the shelves and pulls out 'The Shadow of the Wind' by Julian Carax.But as he grows up, several people seem inordinately interested in his find. Then, one night, as he is wandering the old streets once more, Daniel is approached by a figure who reminds him of a character from the book, a character who turns out to be the devil. This man is tracking down every last copy of Carax's work in order to burn them. What begins as a case of literary curiosity turns into a race to find out the truth behind the life and death of Julian Carax and to save those he left behind...A SUNDAY TIMES bestseller and chosen for the Richard & Judy book club.'Part gothic mystery, past ribald comedy, part political thriller, part Borgesian parable, and all marvellous' SUNDAY TIMES'A hymn of praise to all the joys of reading' INDEPENDENT'A magical tale' CECILIA AHERN'One of those rare novels that combine brilliant plotting with sublime writing' SUNDAY TIMES'Gripping and instantly atmospheric' MAIL ON SUNDAY'A book lover's dream' THE TIMES'Irresistibly readable...Walk down any street in Zafon's Barcelona and you'll glimpse the shades of the past and the secrets of the present' GUARDIAN'Diabolically good' ELLE'This gripping novel has the feel of a gothic ghost story complete with crumbling, ivy-covered mansions, gargoyles and dank prison cells...this is just the sort of literary mystery that would have found favour with Wilkie Collins' DAILY MAIL'A deeply satisfying, rich, full read' SUNDAY TELEGRAPH'A page-turning exploration of obsession in literature and love' SUNDAY EXPRESS'An astounding critical success. There's an intricate plot, a gothic atmosphere and an elusive quest, as well as murders, intrigue and star-crossed lovers' GUARDIAN

W&N

The Maker of Swans

Paraic O’Donnell
Authors:
Paraic O’Donnell

'Compulsive reading . . . rich, strange, beautiful' Helen Macdonald, author of H is for Hawk'A strange, new and captivating look at a magical realm . . . Lavishly entertaining' Independent'Enthralling . . . a literary feast' StylistThe world had forgotten Mr Crowe and his mysterious gifts. Until he killed the poet. He lived a secluded life in the fading grandeur of his country estate. His companions were his faithful manservant and his ward, Clara, a silent, bookish girl who has gifts of her own. Now Dr Chastern, the leader of a secret society, arrives at the estate to call Crowe to account and keep his powers in check. But it is Clara's even greater gifts that he comes to covet most. She must learn to use them quickly, if she is to save them all.

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Bill James (1929-) is the author of numerous thrillers and crime novels as well as a critical work on Anthony Powell. In 2006 he was shortlisted for the Crime Writers' Association's prestigious Duncan Lawrie Dagger award for the year's best crime novel for Wolves of Memory. His work is much loved and critically acclaimed; the Sunday Telegraph describes him as 'bruisingly good' and The Times as 'subtle and riveting to the last page'. He lives in his native South Wales.

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