Anne Somerset - Unnatural Murder: Poison In The Court Of James I - Orion Publishing Group

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Unnatural Murder: Poison In The Court Of James I

The Overbury Murder

By Anne Somerset

  • Paperback
  • £10.99

Royal scandal, set against the background of the Jacobean court, involving love, bribery, poison, treachery and black magic - 'a hugely enjoyable book' (Lucy Hughes-Hallet).

'Wonderfully dramatic ... Probably the juiciest court scandal of the past 500 years' Christopher Hudson, Daily Mail
'A sordid yet fascinating story' Antonia Fraser, The Times

In the autumn of 1615 the Earl and Countess of Somerset were detained on suspicion of having murdered Sir Thomas Overbury. The arrest of these leading court figures created a sensation. The young and beautiful Countess of Somerset had already achieved notoriety when she had divorced her first husband in controversial circumstances. The Earl of Somerset was one of the richest and most powerful men in the kingdom, having risen to prominence as the male 'favourite' of England's homosexual monarch, James I.

In the coming weeks it was claimed that, after sending Sir Thomas Overbury poisoned tarts and jellies, the Somersets had finally killed him by arranging for an enema of mercury sublimate to be administered. In a vivid narrative, Anne Somerset unravels these extraordinary events, which were widely regarded as an extreme manifestation of the corruption and vice that disfigured the court during this period. It is, at once, a story rich in passion and intrigue and a murder mystery, for, despite the guilty verdicts, there is much about Overbury's death that remains enigmatic. Infinitely more than a gripping personal tragedy, the Overbury murder case profoundly damaged the monarchy, and constituted the greatest court scandal in English history.

Biographical Notes

Anne Somerset was born in 1955 and read history at King's College London. In 1980, her first book, The Life and Times of William IV, was published in Weidenfeld & Nicolson's Kings and Queens of England series. This was followed by Ladies-in-Waiting: From the Tudors to the Present Day; a biography of Elizabeth I; Unnatural Murder: Poison at the Court of James I; and The Affair of the Poisons: Murder, Infanticide and Satanism at the Court of Louis XIV.Queen Anne: The Politics of Passion, a biography of England's last Stuart monarch, was awarded the 2013 Elizabeth Longford Prize for Historical Biography.

Until his death in 2011, Anne Somerset was married to the artist Matthew Carr. She lives in London with her daughter.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781474608022
  • Publication date: 19 Oct 2017
  • Page count: 560
  • Imprint: W&N
Wonderfully dramatic ... Probably the juiciest court scandal of the past 500 years. Anne Somerset writes so freshly that her characters strut before us as if they lived today. A gripping detective story that tells us more about the corruption, debauchery and naked power-plays of 17th century life than anything I have read — Christopher Hudson, DAILY MAIL
This is by far the most comprehensive account I have read of the Overbury scandal, combining a firm mastery of complex sources with a narrative drive that impels the reader to turn the page. It is also quite one the best historical whodunnits — Roy Strong, SUNDAY TIMES
Anne Somerset gives us scandal in high places, as well as insights into a seamy underworld of quacks and witches, hustlers and go-betweens; her subsidiary characters stand comparison with Ben Jonson's most outrageous rascals ... Both history and whodunnit, this is a hugely enjoyable book — Lucy Hughes-Hallet, DAILY TELEGRAPH
A sordid yet fascinating story which Anne Somerset delineates with great skill — Antonia Fraser, THE TIMES
Anne Somerset shows skill and stamina in telling her lurid tale....This book consolidates her position in the front rank of historical biographers for the general reader — John Jolliffe, COUNTRY LIFE
A fine and absorbing book, based on fresh scholarship and fresh thinking and deserving both a lay and professional readership — Blair Worden, THE SPECTATOR
This marvellous account of a real-life episode in 1615 bristles with ingredients Webster would have recognised and loved — Max Davidson, DAILY TELGRAPH
Deals in a scholarly but ever readable way with a fascinating historical nugget. This is a book about murder, witchcraft, adultery, lechery, intrigue and chicanery among the country's most powerful nobility — Steve Grant, TIME OUT
Scrupulously researched, her account of the Overbury scandal illuminates the machinations and intrigues which passed for government in Jacobean England — SUNDAY TIMES
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