Related to: 'For Better For Worse and For Richer For Poorer'

Belle de Jour

Belle de Jour is the nom de plume of a former London call girl. Find Belle online at

Carol Drinkwater

Best known for her role as Helen Herriot in BBC Television's ALL CREATURES GREAT AND SMALL (for which she was awarded THE VARIETY CLUB TELEVISION PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR AWARD), Carol Drinkwater has enjoyed a long and distinguished career as both an actress and writer. During her acting career she has worked in film, television and theatre. Her credits include working with Laurence Olivier at the National Theatre and Stanley Kubrick on A CLOCKWORK ORANGE. Carol is the author of six bestselling memoirs: THE OLIVE FARM, THE OLIVE SEASON, THE OLIVE HARVEST, THE OLIVE ROUTE, THE OLIVE TREE and RETURN TO THE OLICE FARM. Carol worked with UNESCO on a lavish documentary film series inspired by her two most recent books, THE OLIVE ROUTE and THE OLIVE TREE. The series is both travel and history based and will follow an Olive Heritage Trail around the Mediterranean Basin. The aim is to celebrate the cultural heritage of this sacred tree. The first transmissions will be in Canada in February and in Germany in April 2013.

Daniel Keyes

Daniel Keyes (1927-2014)Born in Brooklyn in 1927, Daniel Keyes worked as a merchant seaman, editor and university lecturer. He published four other novels, but Flowers for Algernon, originally a short story, for which he won the Hugo Award, later expanded into the Nebula Award-winning novel and adapted as an Oscar-winning film (Charly, 1968) remains his best-known work. Daniel Keyes had a masters degree in English and American literature and was a Professor of English and Creative writing. He died in 2014.

Dave Pelzer

Dave Pelzer is recognised as one of America's most effective and respected communicators addressing corporations, conventions and health/psychology/primary care workers. His unique accomplishments have garnered personal commendations from Ronald Reagan and George Bush. He was selected as torchbearer for the 1996 Olympic Torch relay. He has dedicated his life to helping others help themselves.

David Ebershoff

David Ebershoff is the author of The Rose City, Pasadena, The 19th Wife and The Danish Girl, which has been made into a film starring Academy Award-winner Eddie Redmayne and directed by the Academy Award-winning director of The King's Speech, Tom Hooper. His books have been translated into twenty languages and honoured by the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Lambda Literary Foundation and the American Library Association. He has taught writing at Princeton, NYU and Columbia, and is currently Vice President and Executive Editor at Random House.

Evelyn Doyle

Evelyn Doyle now lives in Scotland with her partner of 14 years Michael. She trained as a psychiatric nurse, then became a police officer and later moved on to running her own patisserie company. She has one son, Benjamin, and grandson Joshua.Molly McCloskey, who collaborated with Evelyn, was born in 1964 in Philadelphia. She published her first collection of short stories, Soloman's Seal, in 1997. Her new collection, The Beautiful Changes, was published by the Lilliput Press in February 2002. She now lives in Ocean City, Co Sligo.Evelyn Doyle now lives in Scotland with her partner of 14 years Michael. She trained as a psychiatric nurse, then became a police officer and later moved on to running her own patisserie company. She has one, Benjamin, and grandson, Joshua.

George East

George East has enjoyed a spectacularly eclectic career path including stints as a pickled onion manufacturer, gravedigger, radio producer, publican and professional bed tester. Now dedicated to writing and to devising increasingly elaborate money-making schemes, George has settled in the Cotentin region of Normandy where he lives very happily with long-suffering wife Donella.

Gwen Wilson

Gwen Wilson began writing her memoir in her fifties, but she has always been a storyteller. Essentially self-educated, she has had to fight hard for what she has achieved in life. After a tough upbringing in the western suburbs of Sydney, Gwen fell into series of traumatic circumstances - all before the age of nineteen. She now lives with her husband Bill in Wollongong, New South

Isabel Ashdown

Isabel Ashdown was born in London and grew up on the south coast of England. She is the author of four novels and winner of the Mail on Sunday Novel Competition. After giving up a successful career in product marketing to study English at the University of Chichester, her debut GLASSHOPPER was published and named as one of the best books of the year by the Observer and the London Evening Standard. She has a first class degree in English and an MA in Creative Writing with distinction. In 2014 Isabel was Writer in Residence at the University of Brighton, where she has taught on their Creative Writing MA. Along with dachshund Leonard she is a volunteer for Pets as Therapy, as part of their Read2Dogs scheme. Isabel lives in West Sussex with her carpenter husband, two children and their dogs.

Jennifer Worth

Jennifer Worth trained as a nurse at the Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, and was later ward sister at the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Hospital in London, then the Marie Curie Hospital, also in London. Music had always been her passion, and in 1973 she left nursing in order to study music intensively, teaching piano and singing for about 25 years. Jennifer died in May 2011 after a short illness, leaving her husband Philip, two daughters and three grandchildren. Her books have all been bestsellers.

Kate Mosse

Kate Mosse is an international bestselling author with sales of more than five million copies in 42 languages. Her fiction includes the novels Labyrinth (2005), Sepulchre (2007), The Winter Ghosts (2009), Citadel (2012), and The Taxidermist's Daughter (2015), as well as an acclaimed collection of short stories, The Mistletoe Bride & Other Haunting Tales (2013). Kate is the Co-Founder and Chair of the Board of the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction (previously the Orange Prize) and in June 2013, was awarded an OBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List for services to literature. She lives in Sussex.

Kate Williams

Kate Williams is an author, social historian and broadcaster. The Storms of War, her first novel in the De Witt trilogy, was widely acclaimed, reviewed as 'spellbinding, gripping and beautiful'. She has always wanted to travel in time and wrote her first novel when she was seven (The Adventures of Maria) - it was rather short.Kate loves delving into archives, collections, diaries and letters. She has a DPhil from Oxford and is the author of the novel The Pleasures of Men and four historical biographies of Emma Hamilton, Queen Victoria, Elizabeth II and Empress Josephine - which is being made into a major TV series.She is Professor of Public History at the University of Reading. Kate is CNN's historian and royal expert, covers royal and national events on the BBC and other channels and regularly appears on other TV programmes, including BBC Breakfast, Restoration Home and The Great British Bake Off, discussing social and royal history, general politics and culture. She also loves quiz shows and is a regular on The Quizeum. She is the resident historian on Frank Skinner's BBC Radio 4 panel show The Rest is History, and writes features, reviews and comment pieces for various newspapers and magazines, including the Sunday Times, Daily Telegraph, Independent and Observer.Kate lives in London.Find out more at and follow her on Twitter @KateWilliamsme

Katie Scarfe

Katie Scarfe trained at LAMDA and has appeared on stage at the National Theatre. She is an experienced audiobook narrator.

Michael Asher

Michael Asher served in the Parachute Regiment and SAS. A fluent Arab speaker, he has lived for years among the Bedouin peoples. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, his published books include SHOOT TO KILL (1990), THESIGER: A BIOGRAPHY (1994) and an acclaimed biography of Lawrence of Arabia. His THE REAL BRAVO TWO ZERO (2002) was a Sunday Times Top 10 best seller.

Miss Read

Miss Read, or in real life Dora Saint, was a teacher by profession who started writing after the second world war, beginning with light essays written for Punch and other journals. She then wrote on educational and country matters and worked as a scriptwriter for the BBC. Miss Read was married to a schoolmaster for sixty-four years until his death in 2004, and they had one daughter. Miss Read was awarded an MBE in the 1998 New Year Honours list for her services to literature, She was the author of many immensely popular books, including two autobiographical works, but it was her novels of English rural life for which she was best known. The first of these Village School, was published in 1955, and Miss Read continued to write about the fictional villages of Fairacre and Thrush Green for many years. She lived near Newbury in Berkshire until her death in 2012.

Paul Carr

Paul Carr is a writer and journalist, specialising in media and popular culture. A former Guardian media columnist, he also edited various publications and founded numerous businesses with varying degrees of abysmal failure. After getting fired from every job he'd ever had - including at least two where he was his own boss - he realised it was easier to write about other people's success than to have any of his own. As the co-founder of two Internet companies he knows the world of Internet moguls both inside and out.Visit Paul Carr's website at and follow him on Twitter at

Paul Johnson

Paul Johnson was born in 1928. He edited the New Statesman in the 1960s and has written over forty books. His Modern Times, a history of the world from the 1920s to the 1990s, has been translated into more than fifteen languages. As well as a weekly column in the Spectator, he contributes to newspapers all over the world.

Robert Kee

Robert Kee was born in 1919 and read history at Magdalen College, Oxford. He was a bomber pilot in the RAF, and after leaving in 1946, he became a journalist. He worked for Picture Post, the Observer and the Sunday Times, and was a literary editor of the Spectator. He was considered one of the great broadcasters of his generation, appearing for many years on both the BBC and ITV as reporter, interviewer and presenter. He took part in current affairs programmes and in documentaries for the BBC and ITV. More recently he wrote on Britain during the Second World War in 1939: The World We Left Behind and 1945: The World We Fought For; also Trial and Error about the Guildford pub bombings. He was awarded the BAFTA Richard Dimbleby Award in 1976. He died in 2013.

Sarah J. Naughton

Sarah J Naughton grew up in Dorset, on a diet of tales of imperiled heroines and wolves in disguise. As an adult her reading matter changed but those dark fairytales had deep roots. Her debut children's thriller, THE HANGED MAN RISES, featured a fiend from beyond the grave menacing the streets of Victorian London, and was shortlisted for the 2013 Costa award. TATTLETALE is her first adult novel, and has a monster of a different kind. Sarah lives in Central London with her husband and two sons.

Simon Dawson

Simon Dawson gave up his job as an estate agent in London and moved to Exmoor with his wife Debbie over a decade ago. He runs courses on smallholding, butchery, food processing and nose-to-tail eating and came first for the South-West on TV's LOCAL FOOD HEROES in 2007. He is much in demand as a journalist and broadcaster, as well as being midwife and foster dad to countless pigs, sheep, goats, chickens, dogs and horses.Follow Simon on Twitter @simondawson1