Related to: 'For Better For Worse and For Richer For Poorer'

A.A. Gill

A. A. Gill (1954-2016) was born in Edinburgh. He was the TV and restaurant critic and regular features-writer for the Sunday Times, a columnist for Esquire and contributor to Australian Gourmet Traveller. He was the author of A. A. Gill is Away, The Angry Island, Previous Convictions, Table Talk, Paper View, A. A. Gill is Further Away and The Golden Door, as well as two novels and the memoir Pour Me, which was shortlisted for the 2016 PEN Ackerley Prize. Lines in the Sand, a collection of his journalism in recent years, will be published in 2017.

Belle de Jour

Belle de Jour is the nom de plume of a former London call girl. Find Belle online at belledejour-uk.blogspot.com.

Carol Drinkwater

Best known for her role as Helen Herriot in BBC Television's ALL CREATURES GREAT AND SMALL (for which she was awarded THE VARIETY CLUB TELEVISION PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR AWARD), Carol Drinkwater has enjoyed a long and distinguished career as both an actress and writer. During her acting career she has worked in film, television and theatre. Her credits include working with Laurence Olivier at the National Theatre and Stanley Kubrick on A CLOCKWORK ORANGE. Carol is the author of six bestselling memoirs: THE OLIVE FARM, THE OLIVE SEASON, THE OLIVE HARVEST, THE OLIVE ROUTE, THE OLIVE TREE and RETURN TO THE OLICE FARM. Carol worked with UNESCO on a lavish documentary film series inspired by her two most recent books, THE OLIVE ROUTE and THE OLIVE TREE. The series is both travel and history based and will follow an Olive Heritage Trail around the Mediterranean Basin. The aim is to celebrate the cultural heritage of this sacred tree. The first transmissions will be in Canada in February and in Germany in April 2013.

Damian Horner

Damian Horner is a highly successful PR and marketing expert. At WCRS, one of London's top agencies, he worked on the iconic 'I bet he drinks Carling Black label' campaign. He was the youngest ever business director at Lowes, and then helped launch Mustoes, where he worked with clients as diverse as Sony, Lever Brothers and Prudential. This is his first book.

Dave Pelzer

Dave Pelzer is recognised as one of America's most effective and respected communicators addressing corporations, conventions and health/psychology/primary care workers. His unique accomplishments have garnered personal commendations from Ronald Reagan and George Bush. He was selected as torchbearer for the 1996 Olympic Torch relay. He has dedicated his life to helping others help themselves.

David Anderson

David Anderson is Lecturer in African Studies at the University of Oxford. He was previously Director of the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. Co-editor 1988-98 of the Journal of African History, he has also edited a number of collections on the history of Kenya and Africa. He lives in St Albans, Hertfordshire.

David Ebershoff

David Ebershoff is the author of The Rose City, Pasadena, The 19th Wife and The Danish Girl, which has been made into a film starring Academy Award-winner Eddie Redmayne and directed by the Academy Award-winning director of The King's Speech, Tom Hooper. His books have been translated into twenty languages and honoured by the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Lambda Literary Foundation and the American Library Association. He has taught writing at Princeton, NYU and Columbia, and is currently Vice President and Executive Editor at Random House.

Deborah Lawrenson

Deborah Lawrenson spent her childhood moving around the world with diplomatic service parents, from Kuwait to China, Belgium, Luxembourg and Singapore. She graduated from Cambridge University and worked as a journalist in London. She is the author of five previous novels, including The Art of Falling, chosen for the prestigious WHSmith Fresh Talent promotion, and Songs of Blue and Gold, inspired by the life of writer-traveller Lawrence Durrell. Deborah is married with a daughter, and lives in Kent. The family spends as much time as possible at a crumbling hamlet in Provence, France, which is the atmospheric setting for The Lantern.Find out more at www.deborah-lawrenson.co.uk

Evelyn Doyle

Evelyn Doyle now lives in Scotland with her partner of 14 years Michael. She trained as a psychiatric nurse, then became a police officer and later moved on to running her own patisserie company. She has one son, Benjamin, and grandson Joshua.Molly McCloskey, who collaborated with Evelyn, was born in 1964 in Philadelphia. She published her first collection of short stories, Soloman's Seal, in 1997. Her new collection, The Beautiful Changes, was published by the Lilliput Press in February 2002. She now lives in Ocean City, Co Sligo.Evelyn Doyle now lives in Scotland with her partner of 14 years Michael. She trained as a psychiatric nurse, then became a police officer and later moved on to running her own patisserie company. She has one, Benjamin, and grandson, Joshua.

Frances Reilly

Frances Reilly does not know when she was born. Abandoned with no birth certificate, her only records were lost at the convent. She lives in Colchester with her family and has recently settled her civil case against the Poor Sisters of Nazareth Convent.

Gary Sheffield

Gary Sheffield is Professor of Modern History at King's College London. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, and author of Forgotten Victory: The First World War - Myths and Realities and The Somme. He broadcasts regularly on television and radio, and writes for the national press. He lives in Oxfordshire. Dr John Bourne is Director of the Centre for First World War Studies at the University of Birmingham. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and Vice-President of the Western Front Association. He has written widely on the First World War, including Britain and the Great War 1914-1918 and Who's Who in the First World War. He lives in Birmingham.

George East

George East has enjoyed a spectacularly eclectic career path including stints as a pickled onion manufacturer, gravedigger, radio producer, publican and professional bed tester. Now dedicated to writing and to devising increasingly elaborate money-making schemes, George has settled in the Cotentin region of Normandy where he lives very happily with long-suffering wife Donella.

Gwen Wilson

Gwen Wilson began writing her memoir in her fifties, but she has always been a storyteller. Essentially self-educated, she has had to fight hard for what she has achieved in life. After a tough upbringing in the western suburbs of Sydney, Gwen fell into series of traumatic circumstances - all before the age of nineteen. She now lives with her husband Bill in Wollongong, New South Wales.www.gwenwilson.com.au

Hugh Thomson

Hugh Thomson's previous books include The White Rock: An Exploration of the Inca Heartland and Nanda Devi, a journey to a usually inaccessible part of the Himalayas. He has led many research expeditions to Peru. He is also a film-maker and has won many awards for his documentaries, which include Indian Journeys with William Dalrymple, and Dancing in the Street: A Rock and Roll History. He lives in Oxfordshire. More details can be seen at www.thewhiterock.co.uk

James Hadley Chase

Born René Brabazon Raymond in London, the son of a British colonel in the Indian Army, James Hadley Chase (1906-1985) was educated at King's School in Rochester, Kent, and left home at the age of 18. He initially worked in book sales until, inspired by the rise of gangster culture during the Depression and by reading James M. Cain's The Postman Always Rings Twice, he wrote his first novel, No Orchids for Miss Blandish. Despite the American setting of many of his novels, Chase (like Peter Cheyney, another hugely successful British noir writer) never lived there, writing with the aid of maps and a slang dictionary. He had phenomenal success with the novel, which continued unabated throughout his entire career, spanning 45 years and nearly 90 novels. His work was published in dozens of languages and over thirty titles were adapted for film. He served in the RAF during World War II, where he also edited the RAF Journal. In 1956 he moved to France with his wife and son; they later moved to Switzerland, where Chase lived until his death in 1985.

Jamie Ivey

Formerly a banker in London, Jamie Ivey elected to quit commuting and office life for a quest in France instead.

Jennifer Worth

Jennifer Worth trained as a nurse at the Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, and was later ward sister at the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Hospital in London, then the Marie Curie Hospital, also in London. Music had always been her passion, and in 1973 she left nursing in order to study music intensively, teaching piano and singing for about 25 years. Jennifer died in May 2011 after a short illness, leaving her husband Philip, two daughters and three grandchildren. Her books have all been bestsellers.

Kate Mosse

Kate Mosse is an international bestselling author with sales of more than five million copies in 42 languages. Her fiction includes the novels Labyrinth (2005), Sepulchre (2007), The Winter Ghosts (2009), Citadel (2012), and The Taxidermist's Daughter (2015), as well as an acclaimed collection of short stories, The Mistletoe Bride & Other Haunting Tales (2013). Kate is the Co-Founder and Chair of the Board of the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction (previously the Orange Prize) and in June 2013, was awarded an OBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List for services to literature. She lives in Sussex.

Kate Williams

Kate Williams is an author, social historian and broadcaster. The Storms of War, her first novel in the De Witt trilogy, was widely acclaimed, reviewed as 'spellbinding, gripping and beautiful'. She has always wanted to travel in time and wrote her first novel when she was seven (The Adventures of Maria) - it was rather short.Kate loves delving into archives, collections, diaries and letters. She has a DPhil from Oxford and is the author of the novel The Pleasures of Men and four historical biographies of Emma Hamilton, Queen Victoria, Elizabeth II and Empress Josephine - which is being made into a major TV series.She is Professor of Public History at the University of Reading. Kate is CNN's historian and royal expert, covers royal and national events on the BBC and other channels and regularly appears on other TV programmes, including BBC Breakfast, Restoration Home and The Great British Bake Off, discussing social and royal history, general politics and culture. She also loves quiz shows and is a regular on The Quizeum. She is the resident historian on Frank Skinner's BBC Radio 4 panel show The Rest is History, and writes features, reviews and comment pieces for various newspapers and magazines, including the Sunday Times, Daily Telegraph, Independent and Observer.Kate lives in London.Find out more at www.kate-williams.com and follow her on Twitter @KateWilliamsme

Martin Windrow

Born in 1944 and educated at Wellington College, Martin Windrow is an Associate of the Royal Historical Society and a member of the Foreign Legion Association of Great Britain. He has worked in publishing since the mid-1960s as a commissioning editor and author.