Related to: 'A Deepness in the Sky'

Gateway

A Fire Upon the Deep

Vernor Vinge
Authors:
Vernor Vinge

Thousands of years hence, many races inhabit a universe where a mind's potential is determined by its location in space - from superintelligent entities in the Transcend, to the limited minds of the Unthinking Depths, where only simple creatures and technology can function. Nobody knows what strange force partitioned space into these 'zones of thought', but when the warring Straumli realm use an ancient Transcendent artefact as a weapon, they unwittingly unleash an awesome power that destroys thousands of worlds and enslaves all natural and artificial intelligence.Fleeing the threat, a family of scientists, including two children, are taken captive by the Tines - an alien race with a harsh medieval culture - and used as pawns in a ruthless power struggle. A rescue party, not entirely composed of humans, must free the children - and retrieve a secret that may save the rest of interstellar civilization.

Gollancz

Zones of Thought

Vernor Vinge
Authors:
Vernor Vinge
Gollancz

Across Realtime

Vernor Vinge
Authors:
Vernor Vinge

Encompassing time-travel, powerful mystery and the future history of humanity to its last handful of survivors, Across Realtime spans millions of years and is an utterly engrossing SF classic.

Brandon Sanderson

Brandon Sanderson was born in Nebraska in 1975. Since then he has written, amongst others The Mistborn books and begun the internationally bestselling Stormlight Archive. He was also chosen by Robert Jordan's family to complete Jordan's Wheel of Time Sequence. He lives in Utah.Visit his website at http://www.brandonsanderson.com, follow him on Twitter at https://twitter.com/BrandSanderson and like him on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/BrandSanderson. Read his blogs at http://mistborn.blogspot.co.uk andhttp://mistborn.livejournal.com.

D. F. Jones

D F Jones (1917-1981) Dennis Feltham Jones was a British science fiction author and a naval commander during World War II and lived in Cornwall.His first novel, Colossus (1966), about a defence super computer which uses its control over nuclear weapons to subjugate humankind, was made into the feature film Colossus: The Forbin Project (1970).

Dan Simmons

Dan Simmons won the World Fantasy Award for his first novel, SONG OF KALI, inspired by his travels in India. In the 1990s he rewrote the SF rulebook with his Hyperion Cantos quartet. He has also written thrillers. Alongside his writing he maintains a career as a college lecturer in English Literature in the USA.

E. R. Eddison

E R Eddison (1882-1945)Eric Rucker Eddison was born in Leeds in 1882 and was schooled by private tutors along with a young Arthur Ransome. He was later educated at Eton and Oxford, becoming a high-ranking British civil servant. His earlier 20th-century novels - most famously The Worm Ouroboros - influenced many of the great fantasy writers who followed him, such as JRR Tolkien, Ursula K. LeGuin and Michael Moorcock. After retiring from the civil service, he lived in Marlborough, Wiltshire until his death in 1945.

Ken Grimwood

KEN GRIMWOOD (1944-2003) was a radio journalist in California. He was the author of Breakthrough, Elise, The Voice Outside and Into the Deep. He won the World Fantasy Award for Replay.

Lord Dunsany

Lord Dunsany (1897-1957)Born in London of an Anglo-Irish family that could trace its roots back to the twelfth century, Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th Baron Dunsany, was a globetrotter, sportsman, hunter, poet, playwright and chessplayer. He wrote The Gods of Pegana in 1904, which became an unexpected succès d'estime and was followed by several collections which have been an insporation for modern fantasy writers.

Matthew Hughes

Matthew Hughes (1949- )Matthew Hughes was born in Liverpool, England, and moved to Canada at a very early age. He has made a living as a writer all his adult life, first as a journalist and then as a staff speechwriter to the Canadian Ministers of Justice and Environment, and - from 1979 until a few years back- as a freelance corporate and political speechwriter in British Columbia. He began to publish short crime fiction in 1982 and his Archonate stories and novels have been compared to the works of Jack Vance. Hughes continues to write and moves wherever his secondary career as a housesitter takes him.

Mickey Zucker Reichert

Mickey Zucker Reichert (1962- )Mickey Zucker Reichert is the working name Miriam Zucker Reichert. Reichert is a paediatrician and is a Doctor of Medicine. She is from a town in Iowa and has fostered and adopted children as well as a variety of animals, describing herself as a "bird wrangler, goat roper, dog trainer, cat herder, horse rider, and fish feeder who has learned (the hard way) not to let macaws remove contact lenses". Reichert began publishing work of genre interest with "Homecoming" for Space & Time in 1989. She has over 22 novels to her name, as well as an illustrated novella and over 50 short stories, and she is best known for her Renshai series, which provides a different perspective on traditional Norse mythology. Reichert was asked to write three prequels of I, Robot by Asimov's estate, being a science fiction author with an MD, and is the first woman to be authorised to write stories based on Asimov's novels.

Patricia A. McKillip

Patricia A. McKillip (1948 - )Patricia Anne McKillip was born on February 29th, 1948, in Salem, Oregon. She is the acclaimed author of many fine fantasy novels for children and adults, including The Forgotten Beasts of Eld and Ombria in Shadow - both of which won the World Fantasy Award - The Sorceress and the Cygnet, Winter Rose and Harpist in the Wind, which was shortlisted for both the Hugo and World Fantasy Awards.

Paul Kidby

Paul Kidby discovered Terry Pratchett's Discworld in 1993 and since then has devoted his working life to the place. He is the illustrator of THE PRATCHETT PORTFOLIO, TERRY PRATCHETT'S DISCWORLD COLOURING BOOK, the bestsellers THE LAST HERO and THE ART OF DISCWORLD, as well as the Discworld DIARIES, cards, T-shirts, maps, mugs and, of course, the covers.

Paul McAuley

Paul McAuley (Born 1955)Paul James McAuley was born in Gloucestershire on St George's Day, 1955. He has a Ph.D in Botany and worked as a researcher in biology at various universities, including Oxford and UCLA, and for six years was a lecturer in botany at St Andrews University, before leaving academia to write full time. He started publishing science fiction with the short story "Wagon, Passing" for Asimov's Science Fiction in 1984. His first novel, 400 Billion Stars won the Philip K. Dick Award in 1988, and 1995's Fairyland won the Arthur C. Clarke and John W. Campbell Awards. He has also won the British Fantasy, Sidewise and Theodore Sturgeon Awards. He lives in London.You can find his blog at: http://www.unlikelyworlds.blogspot.com

Philip K. Dick

Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) was born in Chicago but lived in California for most of his life. He went to college at Berkeley for a year, ran a record store and had his own classical-music show on a local radio station. He published his first short story, 'Beyond Lies the Wub' in 1952. Among his many fine novels are The Man in the High Castle, Time Out of Joint, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said.

R. A. Lafferty

R. A. Lafferty (1914-2002)Raphael Aloysius Lafferty was an American science fiction and fantasy writer born in Neola, Iowa. His first publication of genre interest was 'Day of the Glacier' with Science Fiction Stories in January 1960, although he continued to work in the electrical business until retiring to write full-time in 1970. Over the course of his writing career, Lafferty wrote thirty-two novels and more than two hundred short stories and he was known for his original use of language, metaphor and narrative structure.

Richard Morgan

Richard Morgan was, until his writing career took off, a tutor at Strathclyde University in the English Language Teaching division. He has travelled widely and lived in Spain and Istanbul. He is a fluent Spanish speaker. Winner of the Arthur C. Clarke, John W. Campbell and Philip K. Dick Awards his books are published around the world. He lives in Norwich with his family.

S.J. Morden

Dr S. J. Morden has won the Philip K. Dick Award and been a judge on the Arthur C. Clarke Award. He is a bona fide rocket scientist with degrees in Geology and Planetary Geophysics. ONE WAY is the perfect fusion of his incredible breadth of knowledge and ability to write award-winning, razor-sharp science fiction.

Sam Peters

Sam Peters is a mathematician, part-time gentle-person adventurer and occasional screenwriter who has seen faces glaze over at the words 'science fiction' once too often. Inspirations include Dennis Potter, Mary Doria Russell, Lynda La Plante, Neal Stephenson, and Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure. Has more hopes than regrets, more cats than children, watches a lot of violent contact sport and is an unrepentant closet goth.

Sharon Shinn

Sharon Shinn is an American novelist whose stories combine aspects of fantasy, science fiction and romance. She has published more than a dozen novels for adult and young readers and her works include the Shifting Circle Series, the Samaria Series, the Twelve Houses Series and a rewriting of Jane Eyre, Jenna Starborn. She works as a journalist in St Louis, Missouri and is a graduate of Northwestern University.