Related to: 'No Room for Small Dreams'

Alan Clark

Alan Clark, educated at Eton and Oxford, read for the Bar but did not practise. Tory MP for Plymouth Sutton 1972-1992; Kensington and Chelsea, 1997-99. Various junior ministerial appointments in the Margaret Thatcher and John Major governments of the 1980s. Best-known for his Diaries (three volumes) which The Times placed in the Samuel Pepys class. They were filmed by the BBC with John Hurt as Clark and Jenny Agutter as Jane Clark. Alan Clark died in 1999.

Alistair Beaton

Alistair Beaton is one of the country's leading satirical writers, and makes frequent appearances on Radio 4. His hit comedy Feelgood won the Evening Standard Award in 2001

Alistair Horne

Alistair Horne was educated at Le Rosey, Switzerland, and Jesus College, Cambridge. He ended his war service with the rank of Captain in the Coldstream Guards attached to MI5 in the Middle East. From 1952 to 1955 he worked as a foreign correspondent for the Daily Telegraph. In 1969 he founded the Alistair Horne research fellowship in modern history, St Antony's, Oxford. His numerous books on history and politics have been translated into over ten languages, he was awarded the Hawthornden prize (for THE PRICE OF GLORY) and the Wolfson prize (for A SAVAGE WAR OF PEACE). In 1992 he was awarded the CBE; in 1993 he received the French Légion d'Honneur for his work on French history and a Litt.D. from Cambridge University. He was knighted in 2003 for services to Franco-British relations.

Andrew Roberts

Andrew Roberts took a first in Modern History at Cambridge. He has been a professional historian since the publication of his life of Lord Halifax , The Holy Fox, in 1991, followed by Eminent Churchillians in 1994 . He contributes regularly to the Sunday Telegraph. Lives in Knightsbridge, London, and has two children. His Salisbury won the Wolfson History Prize in 2000. His books include Napoleon and Wellington in 2001, Hitler and Churchill (based on BBC-2 series) in 2003. What Might Have Been (editor) in 2004. His History of the English Speaking Peoples Since 1900 was published in 2006 and won the Walter Bagehot Prize .

Ann Widdecombe

For many years a forthright and high-profile MP, Ann Widdecombe is now as well-known for her star appearances on Strictly Come Dancing and Celebrity Big Brother. A former Prisons Minister, she converted to Roman Catholicism in 1993. Countrywoman, columnist and bestselling author, she lives on Dartmoor. Find out more at

Bernard Lewis

Bernard Lewis is Emeritus Professor of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. Formerly Professor of Middle Eastern History at the School of Oriental & African Studies, London, 1949-74.

Cate Haste

Cate Haste is a writer and freelance documentary film-maker. Her last book, The Goldfish Bowl, co-written with Cherie Booth, is about Prime Ministers¿ spouses at No.10 since 1955. Previous books include Nazi Women, Rules of Desire - a history of sexual mores in the 20th century - and Keep the Home Fires Burning about First World War propaganda.

Christopher Meyer

Christopher Meyer served as Ambassador to the United Kingdom to the United States from 1997 until 2003. He was a vital link in the important relationship between America and Britain, one of the closest periods since the Second World War. He had previously been British Ambassador to Germany and chief spokesman and press secretary for former Prime Minister John Major, and for Geoffrey Howe when he was Foreign Secretary. In 2003 Meyer was appointed Chairman of the Press Complaints Commission, a position he held until April 2009. He was knighted in 2001.

Clarissa Eden

Clarissa Eden was born Clarissa Churchill in 1920 and married Sir Anthony Eden in 1952, thus becoming a Prime Minister's wife in 1955.

David Blakeley

Captain David Blakeley was second in command of the elite Pathfinder Platoon and fought in the Iraq war in 2003 and in Afghanistan after 9/11. Before that, with 1 PARA he saw action in Kosovo, Sierra Leone and Northern Ireland and was, at one point, the youngest Captain in the British Army. After being seriously injured in Iraq he fought his way back to physical fitness and went on to undertake SAS selection. He now works as a military consultant to TV and film production companies. Pathfinder is his first book. He lives in London.Visit David Blakeley's website at and follow him on Twitter

Eric Brown

Eric Brown is in the GUINNESS BOOK OF RECORDS for having flown more aircraft types (487) than any other pilot in history. His record is unlikely ever to be broken. Captain Brown CBE, DSC, AFC, KCVSA, RN, became a test pilot during the Second World War and commanded the RAE Aerodynamics Flight at Farnborough. He played a key role in the design of an entire generation of aircraft. No other man could have claimed to have interrogated several senior Nazis, flown their jet aircraft or tested so many experimental machines. The Royal Navy's most decorated pilot, Captain Eric Brown died in 2016 at the age of 97.

Gordon Corera

Gordon Corera is a Security Correspondent for BBC News. In that role, he covers the work of Britain's intelligence agencies. His documentary series 'MI6: A century in the Shadows' was broadcast on Radio 4 in the summer of 2009. His series 'The Real Spooks' on MI5 was broadcast in December 2007. He is the author of SHOPPING FOR BOMBS on the rise and fall of the Pakistani nuclear arms salesman AQ Khan.

Ion Trewin

Ion Trewin is a London publisher. Originally a journalist, he was Literary Editor of The Times 1972-79. He was Alan Clark's editor and publisher for the original 'Diaries' and following his death edited two further volumes of the celebrated diaries. In 2008 he edited and introduced THE HUGO YOUNG PAPERS: Thirty Years of British Politics Off the Record (Allen Lane) which won the Channel 4 Political Book of the Year Award 2009. Married with a son who is a literary agent and a daughter who is a teacher, he has since 2006 been literary director of the Man Booker prizes. He was chairman of the Cheltenham Literature Festival 1996-2007.

John Julius Norwich

John Julius Norwich was born in 1929. He was educated at Upper Canada College, Toronto, at Eton, at the University of Strasbourg and, after a spell of National Service in the Navy, at New College, Oxford, where he took a degree in French and Russian. In 1952 he joined the Foreign Service, where he remained for twelve years, serving at the embassies in Belgrade and Beirut and with the British Delegation to the Disarmament Conference at Geneva. In 1964 he resigned from the service in order to write.

Kevin Ivison

Captain Kevin Ivison, GM, was commissioned into the army in 2000, and served in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Kosovo, Northern Ireland and Iraq, where his work as a bomb disposal expert won him the George Medal. Since leaving the army in April 2009 he has worked for the Ministry of Defence.

Mick Flynn

Squadron Corporal Major Mick Flynn CGC MC is currently the most highly decorated serving soldier in the British Army. He has seen active service in Northern Ireland, The Falklands, Iraq, Bosnia and Afghanistan. He is currently based in Windsor with his wife and children.

Nathaniel Fick

After receiving a BA in classics from Dartmouth in 1999, Nathaniel Fick passed the US Marines officer training course and joined the Corps just before 9/11. He saw action in Afghanistan and Iraq in the elite First Recon Battalion (the Marines' equivalent of the Navy SEALs or British SBS). Among the first US soldiers to enter Baghdad in the Iraq war, he left the service after being promoted to captain. He is now in a joint degree programme at Harvard Business School and Kennedy School of Government.

Nicholas Monsarrat

Nicholas Monsarrat was born in Liverpool in 1910, and was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge. He served in World War II, first as a member of an ambulance brigade and then as a member of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. His lifelong love of sailing made him a capable naval officer, and he served with distinction on a series of small warships. Resigning his wartime commission in 1946, Monsarrat entered the diplomatic service. He turned to writing full time in 1959, settling on the Mediterranean island of Gozo. He died of cancer in 1979 and was buried at sea from a destroyer, off Portsmouth.

Pamela Hicks

The daughter of Lord Louis and Edwina Mountbatten, Lady Pamela Hicks was Lady in Waiting to the Queen both when she was a princess and following her coronation. In the 1960s she married the flamboyant designer David Hicks who became internationally celebrated. This is Lady Pamela Hicks' second book, her first, India Remembered - an illustrated account of the Mountbattens during the Transfer of Power was published in 2007.

Paul Johnson

Paul Johnson was born in 1928. He edited the New Statesman in the 1960s and has written over forty books. His Modern Times, a history of the world from the 1920s to the 1990s, has been translated into more than fifteen languages. As well as a weekly column in the Spectator, he contributes to newspapers all over the world.