Related to: 'City of Lies'

Adam Roberts

Adam Roberts is commonly described as one of the UK's most important writers of SF. He is the author of numerous novels and literary parodies. He is Professor of 19th Century Literature at Royal Holloway, London University and has written a number of critical works on both SF and 19th Century poetry. He is a contributor to the SF ENCYCLOPEDIA.

Alex Lamb

Alexander Lamb splits his time between writing science fiction, software engineering, teaching improvised theater, running business communication skills workshops, and conducting complex systems research.He is currently working on mobile applications for the publishing industry, and also on the large-scale simulation of battlefields for the US Department of Defense, for the purposes of enabling the evacuation of soldiers by robot. He currently lives in Santa Cruz, CA with his wife, Genevieve Graves, an astrophysicist also at the university there, and their three month old son.

Ben Kane

Ben Kane is one of the most hard-working and successful historical writers in the industry. His third book, The Road to Rome, was a Sunday Times number four bestseller, and every title since has been a top ten bestseller. Born in Kenya, Kane moved to Ireland at the age of seven. After qualifying as a veterinarian, he worked in small animal practice and during the terrible Foot and Mouth Disease outbreak in 2001. Despite his veterinary career, he retained a deep love of history; this led him to begin writing. His first novel, The Forgotten Legion, was published in 2008; since then he has written four series of Roman novels. Kane has walked more than 500 miles in full Roman military gear, including the length of Hadrian's Wall and a long march to Rome. He has also cycled 1500 miles from Spain to Italy via the Alps, à la Hannibal. During these three epic events, he has raised almost £65,000 for charity. He is active on social media and averages more than fifty events per year. Kane lives in Somerset with his wife and two children.

Cathryn Kemp

Cathryn Kemp is an award-winning journalist and author. She has written across the spectrum of the British press, both tabloid and broadsheet, and online, and for many magazines. In 2002 she won the Peter Wilson Award for Journalism before running her own, highly successful press agency writing for radio and television. She is the author of PAINKILLER ADDICT, published by Piatkus in 2012, which won the Big Red Read Prize for non-fiction in 2013. This is a personal and lovingly crafted account of her grandmother's life and her legacy.

Christian Cameron

Christian Cameron is a writer and military historian. He participates in re-enacting and experimental archaeology, teaches armoured fighting and historical swordsmanship, and takes his vacations with his family visiting battlefields, castles and cathedrals. He lives in Toronto and is busy writing his next novel.

Diana Gabaldon

Diana Gabaldon is the internationally bestselling author of many historical novels including CROSS STITCH, DRAGONFLY IN AMBER, VOYAGER, DRUMS OF AUTUMN, THE FIERY CROSS and A BREATH OF SNOW AND ASHES. She lives with her family in Scottsdale, Arizona. Visit her website at www.dianagabaldon.com

Francesca Jakobi

Francesca studied psychology at the University of Sussex, followed by a stint teaching English in Turkey and the Czech Republic. On returning to her native London she got a job as a reporter on a local paper and has worked in journalism ever since. She's currently a layout editor at the Financial Times. Bitter is her first novel.

Godfrey Blunden

Godfrey Blunden (1906-1996) was an Australian journalist and author. He authored several novels, including A Room on the Route and The Time of the Assassins. His novel Charco Harbour is a modernist historical fiction on Captain James Cook and his journey along the Australian coast in 1768. He died in Paris in 1996.

Henry Marsh

Henry Marsh read Politics, Philosophy and Economics at Oxford University before studying medicine at the Royal Free Hospital in London, graduating in 1979. He became a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1984 and was appointed Consultant Neurosurgeon at Atkinson Morley's/St.George's in 1987, where he still works full time.He has been the subject of two major documentary films: Your Life in their Hands (BBC 2003 ) which won the Royal Television Society Gold Medal and The English Surgeon (2009) which won an Emmy. He has lectured widely on the subject of hospital architecture and design, keeps bees and makes furniture in his spare time. He was made a CBE by HM the Queen in 2010. He is married to the best-selling anthropologist and writer Kate Fox.Visit the website www.theenglishsurgeon.com for more information.

Julia Gregson

Julia Gregson's novel East of the Sun was chosen for the Richard and Judy TV Book Club and became a Sunday Times bestseller in the UK. Previously a journalist for the Sydney Morning Herald, The Times, Good Housekeeping, and Rolling Stone in the USA, Julia is married and lives in Monmouth. To find out more about Julia and her books, visit her website www.juliagregson.net or follow her on Twitter at @juliagregson

Kate Binchy

Kate Binchy has worked extensively in all media from West End to fringe theatre. Numerous television appearances include RUTH RENDELL MYSTERIES, FATHER TED, PEAK PRACTICE, CASUALTY, POIROT and FAIR CITY. She has appeared in over 500 radio plays, and films such as MRS DALLOWAY and THE LONELY PASSION OF JUDITH HEARNE. She is Maeve's cousin and has read all of Maeve's audiobooks.

Katharine McMahon

Katharine McMahon studied English and Drama at Bristol University. She has worked as a teacher in schools and universities, as a Royal Literary Fund Fellow supporting student writing, and has run national training courses. She is involved with local theatre and lives with her family in Hertfordshire. Visit her website at katharinemcmahon.com

Kevin Ivison

Captain Kevin Ivison, GM, was commissioned into the army in 2000, and served in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Kosovo, Northern Ireland and Iraq, where his work as a bomb disposal expert won him the George Medal. Since leaving the army in April 2009 he has worked for the Ministry of Defence.

Maeve Binchy

Maeve Binchy was born in County Dublin and educated at the Holy Child convent in Killiney and at University College, Dublin. After a spell as a teacher she joined the Irish Times. Her first novel, Light a Penny Candle, was published in 1982 and she went on to write over twenty books, all of them bestsellers. Several have been adapted for cinema and television, most notably Circle of Friends and Tara Road. Maeve Binchy received a Lifetime Achievement Award at the British Book Awards in 1999 and the Irish PEN/A.T. Cross award in 2007. In 2010 she was presented with the Bob Hughes Lifetime Achievement Award at the Bord Gáis Irish Book Awards by the President of Ireland. She was married to the writer and broadcaster Gordon Snell for 35 years, and died in 2012. Visit her website at www.maevebinchy.com

Maureen Lee

Maureen Lee was born in Liverpool and had numerous short stories published and a play professionally staged before her first novel was published. Her award-winning novels have earned her many fans. Her latest novel, The Leaving of Liverpool, was a Sunday Times top ten bestseller. She is an RNA winner, and writes full time. Maureen now lives in Colchester, Essex.To find out more, visit www.maureenlee.co.uk

Nalini Singh

Nalini Singh was born in Fiji and raised in New Zealand. She spent three years living and working in Japan, and travelling around Asia before returning to New Zealand now - although she's always plotting new trips. She has worked as a lawyer, a librarian, a candy factory general hand, a bank temp and an English teacher, not necessarily in that order. Some people might call that inconsistency, but she calls it grist for the writer's mill.You can learn more by visiting www.nalinisingh.com or by following @NaliniSingh on twitter.

Paul McAuley

Paul McAuley (Born 1955)Paul James McAuley was born in Gloucestershire on St George's Day, 1955. He has a Ph.D in Botany and worked as a researcher in biology at various universities, including Oxford and UCLA, and for six years was a lecturer in botany at St Andrews University, before leaving academia to write full time. He started publishing science fiction with the short story "Wagon, Passing" for Asimov's Science Fiction in 1984. His first novel, 400 Billion Stars won the Philip K. Dick Award in 1988, and 1995's Fairyland won the Arthur C. Clarke and John W. Campbell Awards. He has also won the British Fantasy, Sidewise and Theodore Sturgeon Awards. He lives in London.You can find his blog at: http://www.unlikelyworlds.blogspot.com

Philip K. Dick

Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) was born in Chicago but lived in California for most of his life. He went to college at Berkeley for a year, ran a record store and had his own classical-music show on a local radio station. He published his first short story, 'Beyond Lies the Wub' in 1952. Among his many fine novels are The Man in the High Castle, Time Out of Joint, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said.

Philippe Sands

Philippe Sands is Professor of Law at University College London and a practising barrister at Matrix Chambers. He frequently appears before international courts, including the International Criminal Court and the World Court in The Hague, and has been involved in many of the most important cases of recent years, including Pinochet, Congo, Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Iraq and Guantanamo. His previous books include LAWLESS WORLD (on the illegality of the Iraq war), and TORTURE TEAM (on the embrace of torture by the Bush Administration). He is a frequent contributor to the FINANCIAL TIMES, GUARDIAN, NEW YORK REVIEW OF BOOKS and VANITY FAIR, makes regular appearances on radio and television, and serves on the boards of English PEN and the Hay Festival. @philippesands

Ramita Navai

Ramita Navai was born in Iran and grew up in London, but returned to live in Tehran in 2003. She spent three years as the Tehran correspondent for The Times, covering everything from the Bam earthquake to the escalating nuclear crisis. Since leaving Iran, she has worked as a reporter for Channel 4's primetime and award-winning foreign affairs series, Unreported World, and so far has made nineteen documentaries for the series. Ramita has also worked extensively as a journalist for the United Nations, covering crises in Iran, Pakistan and Iraq and has also written for many publications including the Sunday Times, Irish Times, Independent, Guardian and Marie-Claire and has recently started to blog about her work for the Huffington Post.Follow Ramita Navai on Twitter https://twitter.com/ramitanavai