Jon Wallace - Rig - Orion Publishing Group

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  • Paperback £16.99
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    • ISBN:9780575118898
    • Publication date:16 Jun 2016
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    • ISBN:9780575119086
    • Publication date:16 Jun 2016

Rig

By Jon Wallace

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

A fast-moving, filmic and violent SF thriller, perfect for fans of Jack Campbell. A meeting of The Road and Rogue Trooper.

A fast-moving, filmic and violent SF thriller, perfect for fans of Jack Campbell. A meeting of The Road and Rogue Trooper.

'My nanotech is dead. By definition I am no longer Ficial. On the other hand I don't experience your emotions. That makes me inhuman. Like I said: neither one nor the other.'

Caught in a world that is too busy destroying itself to care for anything except how to exploit the weak, Kenstibec is the ultimate outsider: he used to be invulnerable but now he's just a killer with no-one to kill for.

But when the old world is ending everyone needs a reason to live, someone to live for. Kenstibec is on a
quest. A quest that will take him across a freezing ocean and into the cold heart of a new world order.

Biographical Notes

Jon Wallace debuted with Barricade in 2014. The novel sparked controversy and divided reviewers but also won vociferous fans. He has had short stories published in Interzone. Before writing full time he worked in marketing in the charities sector.

He currently lives in North London with his wife.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780575118928
  • Publication date: 20 Apr 2017
  • Page count: 304
  • Imprint: Gollancz
The worldbuilding is so well done, the mood powerfully maintained and the writing is superb. — FOR WINTER NIGHTS
If this is going to be the final book in the series, then Wallace has gone out on a high. — PILE BY THE BED
Gollancz

Steeple

Jon Wallace
Authors:
Jon Wallace
Orion

Barricade

Jon Wallace
Authors:
Jon Wallace

Kenstibec was genetically engineered to build a new world, but the apocalypse forced a career change. These days he drives a taxi instead.A fast-paced, droll and disturbing novel, BARRICADE is a savage road trip across the dystopian landscape of post-apocalypse Britain; narrated by the cold-blooded yet magnetic antihero, Kenstibec.Kenstibec is a member of the 'Ficial' race, a breed of merciless super-humans. Their war on humanity has left Britain a wasteland, where Ficials hide in barricaded cities, besieged by tribes of human survivors. Originally optimised for construction, Kenstibec earns his keep as a taxi driver, running any Ficial who will pay from one surrounded city to another. The trips are always eventful, but this will be his toughest yet. His fare is a narcissistic journalist who's touchy about her luggage. His human guide is constantly plotting to kill him. And that's just the start of his troubles. On his journey he encounters ten-foot killer rats, a mutant king with a TV fixation, a drug-crazed army, and even the creator of the Ficial race. He also finds time to uncover a terrible plot to destroy his species for good - and humanity too.Read by Rupert Degas(p) 2014 Orion Publishing Group

Adam Roberts

Adam Roberts is commonly described as one of the UK's most important writers of SF. He is the author of numerous novels and literary parodies. He is Professor of 19th Century Literature at Royal Holloway, London University and has written a number of critical works on both SF and 19th Century poetry. He is a contributor to the SF ENCYCLOPEDIA.

Adrian Cole

Adrian Cole was born in Plymouth, Devonshire in 1949. Recently the Director of College Resources in a large secondary school in Bideford, he makes his home there with his wife Judy, son Sam, and daughter Katia. The books of the DREAM LORDS trilogy (Zebra books 1975-1976) were his first books published. Cole has had numerous short stories published in genres ranging from science fiction and fantasy through horror. His works also have been translated into many languages including German, Dutch, Belgian, and Italian. Apart from the STAR REQUIEME and OMARAN SAGA quartets being reprinted by e-reads, some of his most recent works include the VOIDAL TRILOGY (Wildside Press) and STORM OVER ATLANTIS (Cosmos Press).

Alex Lamb

Alexander Lamb splits his time between writing science fiction, software engineering, teaching improvised theater, running business communication skills workshops, and conducting complex systems research.He is currently working on mobile applications for the publishing industry, and also on the large-scale simulation of battlefields for the US Department of Defense, for the purposes of enabling the evacuation of soldiers by robot. He currently lives in Santa Cruz, CA with his wife, Genevieve Graves, an astrophysicist also at the university there, and their three month old son.

Algis Budrys

Algis Budrys (1931-2008) Born in East Prussia in 1931, Budrys and his family were sent to the United States when he was just five. After studying at the University of Miami and Columbia University, Budrys turned his hand to both writing and publishing science fiction. Over the years he worked as an editor, manager and reviewer for various publishing houses, while maintaining an impressive output of fiction and editing his own magazine, Tomorrow Speculative Fiction. He was shortlisted for numerous awards, including the Hugo and the Nebula, for his fiction and critical non-fiction. He died in 2008.

Alvaro Zinos-Amaro

Alvaro grew up in Europe, mostly, and despite the advice of his betters earned a BS in Theoretical Physics at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) in 2003. Alvaro and his co-conspirator and sometimes editor (read, girlfriend) currently reside in sunny Irvine, California.

Anna Sheehan

Anna Sheehan has been a dedicated writer since her first year in high school, when her novella won second place in a local competition, losing only to a (now) professional mystery writer. Her first novel was published serially in a local newsletter when she was 16. She is a regular attendee of the Pacific Northwest Writers Association conference, who first invited her to attend their meeting with a scholarship. Anna lives on an isolated mountain ranch in central Oregon.

Arkady Strugatsky

Arkady Strugatsky (1925-1991) and Boris Strugatsky (1931-2012) Arkady and Boris Strugatsky began to collaborate in the early 1950s after Arkady had studied English and Japanese and worked as a technical translator and editor, and Boris was a computer mathematician at Pulkova astronomical observatory. The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction describes them as 'the best Soviet SF writers' and works such as Hard to be a God, Definitely Maybe, The Snail on the Slope and Monday Begins on Saturday are powerful and poignant novels that continue to amaze and move readers. Andrei Tarkovsky's much admired film, Stalker, was based on their most famous work, Roadside Picnic.Read more at http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/strugatski_arkady

Arthur C. Clarke

Arthur C. Clarke was born in Minehead in 1917. During the Second World War he served as an RAF radar instructor, rising to the rank of Flight-Lieutenant. After the war he won a BSc in physics and mathematics with first class honours from King's College, London. One of the most respected of all science-fiction writers, he also won the KALINGA PRIZE, the AVIATION SPACE-WRITERS PRIZE,and the WESTINGHOUSE SCIENCE WRITING PRIZE. He also shared an OSCAR nomination with Stanley Kubrick for the screenplay of 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY, which was based on his story, 'The Sentinel'. He lived in Sri Lanka from 1956 until his death in 2008. To discover more about how the legacy of Sir Arthur is being honoured today, please visit http://www.clarkefoundation.org

Bernard Wolfe

Bernard Wolfe (1915-1985) was born in New Haven, Connecticut. He worked as a military correspondent for a number of science magazines during the Second World War, and began to write fiction in 1946. He became best known for his 1952 SF novel Limbo.

Boris Strugatsky

Arkady Strugatsky (1925-1991) and Boris Strugatsky (1931-2012) Arkady and Boris Strugatsky began to collaborate in the early 1950s after Arkady had studied English and Japanese and worked as a technical translator and editor, and Boris was a computer mathematician at Pulkova astronomical observatory. The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction describes them as 'the best Soviet SF writers' and works such as Hard to be a God, Definitely Maybe, The Snail on the Slope and Monday Begins on Saturday are powerful and poignant novels that continue to amaze and move readers. Andrei Tarkovsky's much admired film, Stalker, was based on their most famous work, Roadside Picnic.

Bruce Sterling

Bruce Sterling burst onto the SF scene with the birth of Cyberpunk and co-authored THE DIFFERENCE ENGINE with his colleague William Gibson. His biggest UK success was with THE HACKER CRACKDOWN. He lives with his wife and daughters in Austin, Texas.

Charles Sheffield

Charles Sheffield (1935 - 2002) Charles Sheffield, born in the UK in 1935, graduated from St John's College Cambridge with a Double First in Mathematics and Physics. Moving to the USA in the mid 1960's, he began working in the field of particle physics which lead to a consultancy with NASA and landed him the position of chief scientist at the Earth Satellite Corporation. Best known for writing hard SF, his career as a successful science fiction writer began in response to his grief over the loss of his first wife to cancer in 1977; Sheffield has been awarded both the Hugo and Nebula for his work and won the 1992 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel for Brother to Dragons.. He also served as President of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America between 1984 and 1986. For more information see www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/sheffield_charles

Christopher Evans

Christopher Evans is a British chemist, teacher and SF under his own name and a number of pseudonyms. In addition to writing, he edited the Other Edens anthology series with Robert Holdstock. He won the BSFA Award for Best Novel in 1994 with AZTEC CENTURY.

Clifford D. Simak

Clifford D. Simak (1904 -1988)Clifford Donald Simak was born in Wisconsin, in 1904. He attended the University of Wisconsin and spent his working life in the newspaper business. He flirted briefly with science fiction in the early '30s but did not start to write seriously until John W. Campbell's Astounding Stories began to rejuvenate the field in 1937. Simak was a regular contributor to Astounding throughout the Golden Age, producing a body of well regarded work. He won the Nebula and multiple Hugo Awards, and in 1977 was the third writer to be named a Grand Master by SFWA. He died in 1988.

Cordwainer Smith

Cordwainer Smith (1913 - 1966) Cordwainer Smith was the most famous pen name of US foreign policy adviser Paul Myron Anthony Linebarger. Born in Milwaukee in 1913, his godfather was the Chinese revolutionary and political leader, Sun Yat-sen - the result of his political activist father's close ties with leaders of the Chinese revolution. Smith held a PhD in Political Science from Johns Hopkins, served in the US military during the Second World War and acted as an adviser to President Kennedy. Although he only published one novel, Norstrilia, Smith is well regarded for his short fiction, the majority of which is set in his future history of the Instrumentality of Mankind.

E.C. Tubb

Edwin Charles Tubb was born in London in 1919, and was a prolific author of SF, fantasy and western novels, under his own name and a number of pseudonyms. He wrote hundreds of short stories and novellas for the SF magazines of the 50's, including the long-running Galaxy Science Fiction, and was a founding member of the British Science Fiction Association. He died in 2010.

Edmond Hamilton

Edmond Hamilton (1904-1977) Born in Youngstown, Ohio, Edmond Hamilton was raised there and in nearby New Castle, Pennsylvania. He was something of a child prodigy, graduating from high school and undertaking his college education at Westminster College at the young age of 14; he dropped out aged 17. A popular science fiction writer in the mid-twentieth century, Hamilton's career began with the publication of his short story 'The Monster God of Mamurth' in the August 1926 issue of Weird Tales. After the war, he wrote for DC Comics, producing stories for Batman, Superman and The Legion of Superheroes. Ultimately, though, he was associated with an extravagant, romantic, high-adventure style of SF, perhaps best represented by his 1947 novel The Star Kings. He was married to fellow SF writer Leigh Brackett from the end of 1946 until his death three decades later.

Fred Hoyle

Sir Fred Hoyle (1915-2001) Sir Fred Hoyle was a famous English astronomer noted primarily for the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis and his often controversial stances on other scientific matters-in particular his rejection of the "Big Bang" theory, a term coined by him on BBC radio. He has authored hundreds of technical articles, as well as textbooks, popular accounts of science and two autobiographies. In addition to his work as an astronomer, Hoyle was a writer of science fiction, including a number of books co-written with his son Geoffrey Hoyle. Hoyle spent most of his working life at the Institute of Astronomy at Cambridge and served as its director for a number of years. He was knighted in 1972 and died in Bournemouth, England, after a series of strokes.