Related to: 'The Fractal Prince'

Gollancz

Summerland

Hannu Rajaniemi
Authors:
Hannu Rajaniemi

'I burned through it . . . Great book: Tinker Tailer Soldier Spook' Ian McDonaldLoss is a thing of the past. Murder is obsolete. Death is just the beginning. ***** How do you catch a spy who's already dead? In 1938, death is no longer feared but exploited. Since the discovery of the afterlife, the British Empire has extended its reach into Summerland, a metropolis for the recently deceased. But Britain isn't the only contender for power in this life and the next. The Soviets have spies in Summerland, and the technology to build their own god. When SIS agent Rachel White gets a lead on one of the Soviet moles, blowing the whistle puts her hard-earned career at risk. The spy has friends in high places, and she will have to go rogue to bring him in. *************************'Summerland: As if Alfred Hitchcock had made a movie with HP Lovecraft . . . A vision so original it deserves its own subgenre. And all worked out with the diamond-hard logic of a great SF writer. After Summerland, the thriller has a new geometry' Stephen Baxter'Eerily plausible, beautifully pitched on the cusp between wonder and horror, and thoroughly engrossing from the first page to the last' Alastair Reynolds 'Clever, subtle and . . . has a rich emotional centre' SFX'Summerland is in its own way as persuasive an example of Rajaniemi's disciplined inventiveness as his better-known hard SF' LOCUS'Engaging writing, tight plotting and fantastic imagination' Ed McDonald, author of Blackwing'A tense and twisting tale full of delightful allusions and ingeious' Ken MacLeod'An intricate and vivid world of technological and spiritual wonder' Kirkus'Hard to admit, but I think he's better at this stuff than I am' Charles Stross

Gollancz

Invisible Planets

Hannu Rajaniemi
Authors:
Hannu Rajaniemi

Mindblowingly inventive and beautifully written short stories from the most exciting new name in SFHannu Rajaniemi exploded onto the SF scene in 2010 with the publication of his first novel The Quantum Thief. Acclaimed by fellow authors such as Charles Stross, Adam Roberts and Alastair Reynolds and brilliantly reviewed everywhere from Interzone to the Times and the Guardian he swiftly established a reputation as an author who could combine extraordinary cutting edge science with beautiful prose and deliver it all with wit, warmth and a delight in the fun of storytelling.It is exactly these qualities that are showcased in this his first collection of short stories. Drawn from antholgies, magazines and online publications and brought together in book form for the first time in this collection here is a collection of seventeen short stories that range from the lyrical to the bizarre, from the elegaic to the impish. It is a collection that shows one of the great new imaginations in SF having immense fun.

Gollancz

The Causal Angel

Hannu Rajaniemi
Authors:
Hannu Rajaniemi
Gollancz

The Quantum Thief

Hannu Rajaniemi
Authors:
Hannu Rajaniemi

The Quantum Thief is a dazzling hard SF novel set in the solar system of the far future - a heist novel peopled by bizarre post-humans but powered by very human motives of betrayal, revenge and jealousy. It is a stunning debut.Jean le Flambeur is a post-human criminal, mind burglar, confidence artist and trickster. His origins are shrouded in mystery, but his exploits are known throughout the Heterarchy - from breaking into the vast Zeusbrains of the Inner System to steal their thoughts, to stealing rare Earth antiques from the aristocrats of the Moving Cities of Mars. Except that Jean made one mistake. Now he is condemned to play endless variations of a game-theoretic riddle in the vast virtual jail of the Axelrod Archons - the Dilemma Prison - against countless copies of himself. Jean's routine of death, defection and cooperation is upset by the arrival of Mieli and her spidership, Perhonen. She offers him a chance to win back his freedom and the powers of his old self - in exchange for finishing the one heist he never quite managed . . .

Christopher Priest

Christopher Priest's novels have built him an inimitable dual reputation as a contemporary literary novelist and a leading figure in modern SF and fantasy. His novel THE PRESTIGE is unique in winning both a major literary prize (THE JAMES TAIT BLACK AWARD and a major genre prize THE WORLD FANTASY AWARD); THE SEPARATION won both the ARTHUR C. CLARKE and the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARDS. THE ISLANDERS won both the BSFA and John W. Campbell awards. He was selected for the original BEST OF YOUNG BRITISH NOVELISTS in 1983.

D. F. Jones

D F Jones (1917-1981) Dennis Feltham Jones was a British science fiction author and a naval commander during World War II and lived in Cornwall.His first novel, Colossus (1966), about a defence super computer which uses its control over nuclear weapons to subjugate humankind, was made into the feature film Colossus: The Forbin Project (1970).

E.E. 'Doc' Smith

E. E. 'Doc' Smith (1890 - 1965) Edward Elmer Smith was born in Wisconsin in 1890. He attended the University of Idaho and graduated with degrees in chemical engineering; he went on to attain a PhD in the same subject, and spent his working life as a food engineer. Smith is best known for the 'Skylark' and 'Lensman' series of novels, which are arguably the earliest examples of what a modern audience would recognise as Space Opera. Early novels in both series were serialised in the dominant pulp magazines of the day: Argosy, Amazing Stories, Wonder Stories and a pre-Campbell Astounding, although his most successful works were published under Campbell's editorship. Although he won no major SF awards, Smith was Guest of Honour at the second World Science Fiction Convention in Chicago, in 1940. He died in 1965.

Gavin G. Smith

Gavin G. Smith is the Dundee-born author of the hard edged, action-packed SF novels Veteran, War in Heaven, Age of Scorpio, A Quantum Mythology and The Beauty of Destruction, as well as the short story collection Crysis: Escalation. He has collaborated with Stephen Deas as the composite personality Gavin Deas and co-written Elite: Wanted, and the shared world series Empires: Infiltration and Empires: Extraction.

George Turner

George Turner (1916-1997) George Reginald Turner was an Australian writer and critic, best known for the science fiction novels written in the later part of his career. His mainstream novel, The Cupboard Under the Stairs won the Miles Franklin Award, Australia's highest literary honour. His best-known SF novel, The Drowning Towers, was published in the UK under the title The Sea and Summer, and won the second Arthur C. Clarke Award in 1988. George Turner was named as a Guest of Honour for the 1999 World Science Fiction Convention held in his home town of Melbourne, but died before the event.

Isaac Asimov

Isaac Asimov (1920 - 1992)Isaac Asimov was one of the most famous, honoured and widely read science fiction authors of all time. Born in Russia but raised in the USA, his career as an SF writer began in 1939 with 'Marooned Off Vesta', in Amazing Stories. His output was prolific by any standards - in a career spanning five decades, he wrote more than four hundred books, won six Hugos, two Nebulas and the SFWA Grand Master Award, among many others, and provided pleasure and insight to millions of readers. He died in 1992 at the age of 72.

Justin Cronin

Born and raised in New England, Justin Cronin is a multi-award-winning writer. He is Professor of English at Rice University, and lives with his family in Houston, Texas.

Ken Grimwood

KEN GRIMWOOD (1944-2003) was a radio journalist in California. He was the author of Breakthrough, Elise, The Voice Outside and Into the Deep. He won the World Fantasy Award for Replay.

Lord Dunsany

Lord Dunsany (1897-1957)Born in London of an Anglo-Irish family that could trace its roots back to the twelfth century, Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th Baron Dunsany, was a globetrotter, sportsman, hunter, poet, playwright and chessplayer. He wrote The Gods of Pegana in 1904, which became an unexpected succès d'estime and was followed by several collections which have been an insporation for modern fantasy writers.

Mark Stay

Mark is co-writer of the feature film Robot Overlords. He has performed with Unity Theatre in London and appeared at the Edinburgh Festival exactly one and a half times. After many years working in theatre and bookselling he turned to screenwriting. Robot Overlords is his first film in production, and first novel.Mark Stay lives in London, and you can learn more by visiting unusuallytallstories.wordpress.com of following @markstay on twitter.

Mickey Zucker Reichert

Mickey Zucker Reichert (1962- )Mickey Zucker Reichert is the working name Miriam Zucker Reichert. Reichert is a paediatrician and is a Doctor of Medicine. She is from a town in Iowa and has fostered and adopted children as well as a variety of animals, describing herself as a "bird wrangler, goat roper, dog trainer, cat herder, horse rider, and fish feeder who has learned (the hard way) not to let macaws remove contact lenses". Reichert began publishing work of genre interest with "Homecoming" for Space & Time in 1989. She has over 22 novels to her name, as well as an illustrated novella and over 50 short stories, and she is best known for her Renshai series, which provides a different perspective on traditional Norse mythology. Reichert was asked to write three prequels of I, Robot by Asimov's estate, being a science fiction author with an MD, and is the first woman to be authorised to write stories based on Asimov's novels.

Peter Kenny

As both actor and singer, PETER KENNY has worked widely in theatre and broadcasting, appearing with, amongst others, the Royal Shakespeare Company, A&BC, Coventry Belgrade, and the BBC Radio Repertory Company. He is a prolific audiobook reader and his titles include The Wasp Factory and Look To Windward by Iain Banks, and The Prisoner of Heaven by Carlos Ruiz Zafon.

R. A. Lafferty

R. A. Lafferty (1914-2002)Raphael Aloysius Lafferty was an American science fiction and fantasy writer born in Neola, Iowa. His first publication of genre interest was 'Day of the Glacier' with Science Fiction Stories in January 1960, although he continued to work in the electrical business until retiring to write full-time in 1970. Over the course of his writing career, Lafferty wrote thirty-two novels and more than two hundred short stories and he was known for his original use of language, metaphor and narrative structure.

Sam Peters

Sam Peters is a mathematician, part-time gentle-person adventurer and occasional screenwriter who has seen faces glaze over at the words 'science fiction' once too often. Inspirations include Dennis Potter, Mary Doria Russell, Lynda La Plante, Neal Stephenson, and Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure. Has more hopes than regrets, more cats than children, watches a lot of violent contact sport and is an unrepentant closet goth.

Sharon Shinn

Sharon Shinn is an American novelist whose stories combine aspects of fantasy, science fiction and romance. She has published more than a dozen novels for adult and young readers and her works include the Shifting Circle Series, the Samaria Series, the Twelve Houses Series and a rewriting of Jane Eyre, Jenna Starborn. She works as a journalist in St Louis, Missouri and is a graduate of Northwestern University.

Stephen Donaldson

Stephen Donaldson lived in India for 13 years with his father, a medical missionary, who worked extensively with lepers; it was here that he conceived the character of Thomas Covenant. He was awarded the John W. Campbell Award as Best Writer of the Year for The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant The Unbeliever, which, with the sequel trilogy, became instant bestsellers. He is also the author of the fantasy duology 'Mordant's Need', the SF epic quintet 'The Gap', and a number of mysteries written under the pseudonym Reed Stephens. He won the World Fantasy Award in 2000. The four books of The Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant have been acclaimed worldwide.