Related to: 'The Fractal Prince'

Gollancz

Summerland

Hannu Rajaniemi
Authors:
Hannu Rajaniemi

I burned through it . . . Great book: Tinker Tailer Soldier Spook' Ian McDonaldLoss is a thing of the past. Murder is obsolete. Death is just the beginning. ***** How do you catch a spy who's already dead? In 1938, death is no longer feared but exploited. Since the discovery of the afterlife, the British Empire has extended its reach into Summerland, a metropolis for the recently deceased. But Britain isn't the only contender for power in this life and the next. The Soviets have spies in Summerland, and the technology to build their own god. When SIS agent Rachel White gets a lead on one of the Soviet moles, blowing the whistle puts her hard-earned career at risk. The spy has friends in high places, and she will have to go rogue to bring him in.

Gollancz

Invisible Planets

Hannu Rajaniemi
Authors:
Hannu Rajaniemi
Gollancz

The Causal Angel

Hannu Rajaniemi
Authors:
Hannu Rajaniemi
Gollancz

The Quantum Thief

Hannu Rajaniemi
Authors:
Hannu Rajaniemi

The Quantum Thief is a dazzling hard SF novel set in the solar system of the far future - a heist novel peopled by bizarre post-humans but powered by very human motives of betrayal, revenge and jealousy. It is a stunning debut.Jean le Flambeur is a post-human criminal, mind burglar, confidence artist and trickster. His origins are shrouded in mystery, but his exploits are known throughout the Heterarchy - from breaking into the vast Zeusbrains of the Inner System to steal their thoughts, to stealing rare Earth antiques from the aristocrats of the Moving Cities of Mars. Except that Jean made one mistake. Now he is condemned to play endless variations of a game-theoretic riddle in the vast virtual jail of the Axelrod Archons - the Dilemma Prison - against countless copies of himself. Jean's routine of death, defection and cooperation is upset by the arrival of Mieli and her spidership, Perhonen. She offers him a chance to win back his freedom and the powers of his old self - in exchange for finishing the one heist he never quite managed . . .

Adam Roberts

Adam Roberts is commonly described as one of the UK's most important writers of SF. He is the author of numerous novels and literary parodies. He is Professor of 19th Century Literature at Royal Holloway, London University and has written a number of critical works on both SF and 19th Century poetry. He is a contributor to the SF ENCYCLOPEDIA.

Brandon Sanderson

Brandon Sanderson was born in Nebraska in 1975. Since then he has written, amongst others The Mistborn books and begun the internationally bestselling Stormlight Archive. He was also chosen by Robert Jordan's family to complete Jordan's Wheel of Time Sequence. He lives in Utah.Visit his website at http://www.brandonsanderson.com, follow him on Twitter at https://twitter.com/BrandSanderson and like him on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/BrandSanderson. Read his blogs at http://mistborn.blogspot.co.uk andhttp://mistborn.livejournal.com.

Carrie Vaughn

Carrie Vaughn was born in California, but grew up all over the country, a bona fide Air Force Brat. She currently lives in Colorado with her miniature American Eskimo dog, Lily. She has a Masters degree in English Lit, loves to travel, and is known occasionally to pick up a rapier.

Edgar Pangborn

Edgar Pangborn (1909 - 1976) Edgar Pangborn was born in New York City and pursued music studies at Harvard when just 15 years old. He went on to study at the New England Conservatory but did not graduate from either course. He then turned his back on music, focusing on writing. It was in the early 50s that his writing career flourished, and he produced a string of highly regarded stories for the likes of Galaxy, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction and Ellery Queen's Mystery magazine. His work helped establish a new 'humanist' school of science fiction, and he has been cited by Ursula Le Guin as one of the authors who convinced her that it was possible to write worthwhile, humanly emotional stories within science fiction and fantasy. He died in New York in 1976.

Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert (1920-86) was born in Tacoma, Washington and worked as a reporter and later editor of a number of West Coast newspapers before becoming a full-time writer. His first SF story was published in 1952 but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication in Analog of 'Dune World' and 'The Prophet of Dune' that were amalgamated in the novel Dune in 1965.

Greg Egan

Greg Egan lives in Perth, Western Australia. He has won the John W. Campbell award for Best Novel and has been short listed for the Hugo three times.

Hannu Rajaniemi

Hannu Rajaniemi is from Finland and has a PhD in String Theory. He lived, taught and worked in Edinburgh for many years where he was a member of the high profile writing group that also included Hal Duncan and Alan Campbell. He currently lives in California. His first novel, THE QUANTUM THIEF was widely and hugely praised and has been published in several countries. As well as writing novels he also works in the areas of number and game theory and artificial intelligence.

Ian McDonald

Ian McDonald was born in Manchester in 1960. His family moved to Northern Ireland in 1965. He now lives in Belfast and works in TV production. The author of many previous novels, including the groundbreaking Chaga books set in Africa, Ian McDonald has long been at the cutting edge of SF. RIVER OF GODS won the BSFA award in 2005, BRASYL won in it in 2007 and THE DERVISH HOUSE in 2010.

Justina Robson

Justina Robson is an Arthur C. Clarke shortlisted author of ten SFF novels, including the highly regarded Quantum Gravity series, and was one of the first writers to win amazon.co.uk's Writer's Bursary in 2000. Based in Leeds, she's been shortlisted for multiple international awards and is a sought-after creative writing teacher who has taught at the Arvon Foundation. A graduate of the Clarion West workshops in Seattle (1996) she has been invited to teach there also, though she hasn't made it yet for various practical reasons. She acted as a judge for the Arthur C Clarke awards on behalf of the Science Fiction Foundation in 2006. Her most recently published novel is Glorious Angels, shortlisted for the British Science Fiction Association Best Novel 2015. You can learn more at justinarobson.co.uk or by following @JustinaRobson on Twitter.

Karen Joy Fowler

Karen Joy Fowler is the author of four earlier novels and two short story collections. Her debut novel, Sarah Canary, was a New York Times Notable Book, as was her second novel, The Sweetheart Season. Fowler's short story collection Black Glass won the World Fantasy Award in 1999. Fowler and her husband, who have two grown children, live in Davis and Santa Cruz, California.

Lucius Shepard

Lucius Shepard (1947 - 2014)Lucius Shepard was born in the USA in 1947. From the mid-1960s to the early 1980s he lived in various parts of the world and travelled widely. He won the John W. Campbell Award for best new writer in 1985 and also won the World Fantasy Award twice. He died in 2014.

Peter Kenny

As both actor and singer, PETER KENNY has worked widely in theatre and broadcasting, appearing with, amongst others, the Royal Shakespeare Company, A&BC, Coventry Belgrade, and the BBC Radio Repertory Company. He is a prolific audiobook reader and his titles include The Wasp Factory and Look To Windward by Iain Banks, and The Prisoner of Heaven by Carlos Ruiz Zafon.

Richard Matheson

Richard Matheson (1926-2013)Richard Matheson was born in 1926. He began publishing SF with his short story 'Born of Man and Woman' which appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in 1950. I Am Legend was published in 1954 and has been adapted to film three times. Matheson wrote the script for the film The Incredible Shrinking Man, an adaptation of his second SF novel The Shrinking Man (published in 1956). The film won a Hugo award in 1958. He wrote many screenplays (including The Fall of the House of Usher) as well as episodes of The Twilight Zone. He continued to write short stories and novels, some of which formed the basis for film scripts, including Duel, directed by Steven Spielberg in 1971. Further SF short stories were collected in The Shores of Space (1957) and Shock! (1961). His other novels include Hell House (1971) (filmed as The Legend of Hell House in 1973), Bid Time Return (1975), Earthbound (1982) and Journal of the Gun Years (1992). A film of his novel What Dreams May Come (1978) was released in 1998, starring Robin Williams. A collection of his stories from the 1950s and 1960s was released in 1989 as Richard Matheson: Collected Stories. He died in 2013.

Richard Morgan

Richard Morgan was, until his writing career took off, a tutor at Strathclyde University in the English Language Teaching division. He has travelled widely and lived in Spain and Istanbul. He is a fluent Spanish speaker. Winner of the Arthur C. Clarke, John W. Campbell and Philip K. Dick Awards his books are published around the world. He lives in Norwich with his family.

Rob Grant

Rob Grant was born in Salford. Determined not to let them hold him back he (after a protracted period doing any old thing) went on to co-create and write with Doug Naylor the astonishingly successful TV series RED DWARF. He also wrote the DARK AGES and STRANGERERS TV series.

S.J. Morden

Dr S. J. Morden has won the Philip K. Dick Award and been a judge on the Arthur C. Clarke Award. He is a bona fide rocket scientist with degrees in Geology and Planetary Geophysics. ONE WAY is the perfect fusion of his incredible breadth of knowledge and ability to write award-winning, razor-sharp science fiction.