Paul Cornell, Martin Day, and Keith Topping - The Doctor Who Discontinuity Guide - Orion Publishing Group

The Doctor Who Discontinuity Guide

By Paul Cornell, Martin Day, and Keith Topping

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

The classic guide to the original Doctor Who series returns! One of the most influential and fondly-remembered guides to the longest running SF series in the world.

When it was originally published, the Discontinuity Guide was the first attempt to bring together all of the various fictional information seen in BBC TV's DOCTOR WHO, and then present it in a coherent narrative. Often copied but never matched, this is the perfect guide to the 'classic' Doctors.

Fulffs, goofs, double entendres, fashion victims, technobabble, dialogue disasters: these are just some of the headings under which every story in the Doctor's first twenty-seven years of his career is analysed.

Despite its humorous tone, the book has a serious purpose. Apart from drawing attention to the errors and absurdities that are among the most loveable features of DOCTOR WHO, this reference book provides a complete analysis of the story-by-story creation of the Doctor Who Universe.

One sample story, Pyramids of Mars, yields the following gems:

TECHNOBABBLE: a crytonic particle accelerator, a relative continuum stabiliser, and triobiphysics.

DIALOGUE TRIUMPHS: 'I'm a Time Lord... You don't understand the implications. I'm not a human being. I walk in eternity.'

CONTINUITY: the doctor is about 750 years old at this point, and has apparently aged 300 years since Tomb of the Cybermen. He ages about another 300 years between this story and the seventh' Doctor's Time and the Rani.

An absolute must for every Doctor Who fan, this new edition of the classic reference guide has not been updated at all for the 50th anniversary.

Biographical Notes

Paul Cornell, Martin Day and Keith Topping have written 5 TV guides together, all of which are now being republished under the SFGateway imprint.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780575133181
  • Publication date: 31 Oct 2013
  • Page count: 192
Gateway

X-Treme Possibilities

Paul Cornell, Martin Day, Keith Topping

'Open your mind to extreme possibilities'Scully's desire to be recognised as 'a medical doctor', ooze, mouthfuls of difficult dialogue and the tendency for characters not to make it through the pre-titles sequence were just a few of the tragically underexamined elements of THE X-FILES phenomenon - until the first edition of this book. Now the authors take their study of televisions weirdest show through to the end of series five, and THE X-FILES movie.X-TREME POSSIBILITIES presents a unique analysis of the programme that transformed US television. While sometimes witty and light-hearted, this volume is also a serious study of the elements that made the show such a success. As well as a detailed episode guide of the first five seasons, the book pieces together the nature of the series' Conspiracy - and attempts to discover just what the truth is.Never before has THE X-FILES been put under such focused, affectionate and bizarre scrutiny. Please note this new release of the second edition has not been updated.

Gateway

The New Trek Programme Guide

Paul Cornell, Martin Day, Keith Topping
Gateway

The Avengers Dossier

Paul Cornell, Martin Day, Keith Topping

More than any other series, THE AVENGERS typified the Swinging Sixties - beginning in 1961 with Patrick Macnee starring with Ian Hendry in a grainy, realistic spy thriller, and ending in 1969 with Macnee and the glamorous Linda Thorson blasting off into space in a surreal episode appropriately entitled 'Bizarre'. Meanwhile we had seen the memorable Honor Blackman and Diana Rigg in roles unusually progressive for British television.THE NEW AVENGERS in the mid-seventies reflected changing times but retained the essence of the show - as Macnee returned to play alongside another strong, independent heroine in the form of Joanna Lumley's Purdey. And then there was the film...THE AVENGERS DOSSIER is a uniquely comprehensive yet humorous survey of all the show's incarnations. As well as a remarkably detailed episode guide to both series - even covering the kinkiness factor and champagne count in both - this volume gives behind the scenes insights and revelations about every aspect of the programme. The film and its production are examined, and critical essays look at the history behind the cult.

Gateway

The Classic British Telefantasy Guide

Paul Cornell, Martin Day, Keith Topping
Orion

Inverting the Pyramid

Jonathan Wilson
Orion

The Anatomy of Liverpool

Jonathan Wilson, Scott Murray

Much of the acres of football news coverage these days has little to do with what actually occurs on the pitch. Jonathan Wilson has established himself as one of the sport's pre-eminent writers, focussing on the tactics (with the award-winning INVERTING THE PYRAMID) and how events on the pitch have shaped football history (THE ANATOMY OF ENGLAND). His new book is a compellingly forensic analysis of ten key Liverpool matches that have shaped the club's fortunes for more than a century - from the long-lost triumphs of manager Tom Watson, who arrived in 1896, to the 1977 European Cup triumph over Borussia M?nchengladbach, to the astonishing Champions League Final comeback against AC Milan, 'The Miracle of Istanbul', in 2005. Legendary players and managers of the stature of Bill Shankly, Bob Paisley and Kenny Dalglish populate these pages, which highlight the genius and the flaws of individuals by examining them in practice.Certain games lie on the fault-lines of history. Perhaps they mark the end of one era or the beginning of another. Perhaps they encapsulate a summation of a manager's reign. Or perhaps they mark a crossroads, moments at which football looked one way, and then went the other. But this is not a virtual history of Liverpool FC. Jonathan Wilson's prime purpose is not to speculate on what might have been. Rather it will try to determine why what was, was. No game is won or lost, after all, in a single moment but by a million little things.THE ANATOMY OF LIVERPOOL tells the story of a great club through a detailed examination of ten key matches looking, as a football history must, first and foremost at the football.

Gateway

The Chinese Agent

Michael Moorcock

Arthur Hodgkiss - a master gem thief - is in London, about to realise his lifelong ambition to steal the Crown Jewels. But he is mistaken for Chinese agent, Kung Fu Tzu, and is unwittingly given a package containing stolen top secret government plans. Enter British Intelligence who put their top man on the job: the suave, fearless ladies' man, Jerry Cornell. There ensues a chaotic comedy of errors in which Jerry Cornell pursues Kung Fu Tzu, the titular Chinese agent, who is in turn pursuing Arthur Hodgkiss, who was given the secret plans for which Cornell is pursuing Kung Fu Tzu. In this perfect circle of bluff and counter-bluff, the only one thing that is certain is that nothing can be known for sure.

Orion

The Anatomy of England

Jonathan Wilson

Having invented the game, for England and its national football team, everything that has followed has been something of an anti-climax. There was, of course, the golden summer of 1966, when Alf Ramsey's radicalism in unveiling his wingless wonders in a World Cup quarter-final paid dividends. And there was the great period of English dominance on the world stage, which fell roughly between 1886 and 1900, when England won 35 of their 40 internationals . . .But before long foreign teams, with their insistence on progressive 'tactics', began to pose a few questions. And much of what followed for England constituted a series of false dawns (a thrashing of Italy in 1948; one World Cup triumph; the demolition of Holland in Euro '96), muddling through and by and large panicking under pressure.In The Anatomy of England award-winning journalist Jonathan Wilson seeks to place the bright spots in the context of the twentieth-century, where, time and again, progressive coaches have been spurned by England - technique being all very well, but what really matters is pluck and 'organised muscularity', or to quote Jimmy Hogan's chairman at Aston Villa in 1936: 'I've no time for these theories about football. Just get the ball in the bloody net.'Wilson takes ten key England fixtures - from defeat in Madrid in 1929; to Steve McLaren's evening to forget at Wembley in 2007 - and hacks back through the myth, conjecture and personal recollections, to get at the games themselves, and explore how what actually happened on the pitch shaped the future of the English game. Bursting with insight and critical detail, yet imbued with a wry affection, this is a history of England like no other before.

Phoenix

The Lost Chronicles Of The Maya Kings

David Drew

Over the last two centuries explorers have made the most remarkable discoveries in the tropical forests of Central America. Across much of present-day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize and Honduras dozens of cities - some with populations of well over 100,000 - have been unveiled, and every year fresh reports emerge of the findings of unknown Maya ruins - great temples, palaces, towering stone pyramids and the tombs of the Maya kings. What these spectacular discoveries indicate is the former presence of an exceptionally advanced, sophisticated and complex society. Recently, major developments made in the decipherment of Maya hieroglyphics have revealed that alongside the material achievements of the Maya ran intellectual accomplishments in astronomy, maths and calendrics, seemingly tied to the complexities of Maya religion, that were remarkable for a society technically in the Stone Age. From reliefs on temple walls, from magnificent hieroglyphic stairways and from stone stelae planted by Maya rulers in the plazas of their cities has come written history: the Chronicles of the Maya Kings.David Drew looks at why they constructed their cities in the hostile setting of the jungle, the exact age of their ruins, the strange human images depicted in elaborate costume at so many Maya sites, and he asks why at the time of the Spanish conquest, all knowledge of the Mayas had been lost.

Keith Topping

Full-time survivor, dandy highwayman, bon vivant, author, journalist and broadcaster yer actual Keith Topping's bibliography includes over 40 books; he was the co-editor of two editions of The Guinness Book of Classic British TV and has written or co-written volumes on TV series as diverse as The X-Files, Star Trek, The Avengers, 24, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel and Stargate SG-1, as well as music and film critique. He authored four Doctor Who novels (including the award-winning The Hollow Men, with Martin Day) and a novella. His work includes two editions of the acclaimed West Wing guide Inside Bartlet's White House, A Vault of Horror: A Book of 80 Great (and not-so-great) British Horror Movies, Do You Want to Know a Secret?: A Fab Anthology of Beatles Facts and Doctor Who: The Discontinuity Guide. Keith was a regular contributor to numerous TV and genre magazines and was a former Contributing Editor to DreamWatch. He is widely considered one of Britain's foremost experts on the bewildering complexities of US network television. No, he hasn't the faintest idea why either.

Novel Inspired HBO’s 'True Detective'

Gollancz and the SF Gateway republish ‘The King in Yellow’

If you’re about to watch True Detective and want to be on top of the subtleties, or even if you just fancy some quality short fiction with creepy undertones, check out THE KING IN YELLOW.

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W&N

The Burning Answer

Keith Barnham

Our civilisation faces a choice. We could be enjoying a sustainable lifestyle but we have chosen not to. In three generations we have consumed half the oil produced by photosynthesis over eight million generations. In two generations we have used half our uranium resources. With threats from global warming, oil depletion and nuclear disaster, we are running out of options. Solar power, as Keith Barnham explains, is the solution. In THE BURNING ANSWER he uncovers the connections between physics and politics that have resulted in our dependence on a high-carbon lifestyle, which only a solar revolution can now overcome. Einstein's famous equation E=mc2 led to the atomic bomb and the widespread use of nuclear energy; it has delayed a solar revolution in many countries. In a fascinating tour of recent scientific history, Keith Barnham reveals Einstein's other, less famous equation, the equation the world could have relied on. Einstein's other equation has given us the laptop and mobile phone, and it also provides the basis for solar technology. Some countries have harnessed this for their energy needs, and it is not too late for us to do the same. In this provocative, inspiring, passionately argued book, Keith Barnham outlines actions that any one and all of us can take to make an impact now and on future generations. THE BURNING ANSWER is a solar manifesto for the new climate-aware generation, and a must-read for climate-change sceptics.

W&N

Life

Keith Richards

With the Rolling Stones, Keith Richards created the riffs, the lyrics and the songs that roused the world, and over four decades he lived the original rock and roll life: taking the chances he wanted, speaking his mind, and making it all work in a way that no one before him had ever done.Now, at last, the man himself tells us the story of life in the crossfire hurricane. And what a life. Listening obsessively to Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters records as a child in post-war Kent. Learning guitar and forming a band with Mick Jagger and Brian Jones. The Rolling Stones' first fame and success as a bad-boy band. The notorious Redlands drug bust and subsequent series of confrontations with a nervous establishment that led to his enduring image as outlaw and folk hero. Creating immortal riffs such as the ones in 'Jumping Jack Flash' and 'Street Fighting Man' and 'Honky Tonk Women'. Falling in love with Anita Pallenberg and the death of Brian Jones. Tax exile in France, wildfire tours of the US, 'Exile on Main Street' and 'Some Girls'. Ever increasing fame, isolation and addiction. Falling in love with Patti Hansen. Estrangement from Mick Jagger and subsequent reconciliation. Solo albums and performances with his band the Xpensive Winos. Marriage, family and the road that goes on for ever.In a voice that is uniquely and intimately his own, with the disarming honesty that has always been his trademark, Keith Richards brings us the essential life story of our times.

Gateway

The Killing Machine

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Gateway

Deathbird Stories

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Harlan Ellison's masterwork of myth and terror as he seduces all innocence on a mind-freezing odyssey into the darkest reaches of mortal terror and the most dazzling heights of Olympian hell in his finest collection. Deathbird Stories is a collection of 19 of Harlan Ellison's best stories, including Edgar and Hugo winners, originally published between 1960 and 1974. The collection contains some of Ellison's best stories from earlier collections and is judged by some to be his most consistently high quality collection of short fiction. The theme of the collection can be loosely defined as God, or Gods. Sometimes they're dead or dying, some of them are as brand-new as today's technology. Unlike some of Ellison's collections, the introductory notes to each story can be as short as a phrase and rarely run more than a sentence or two. One story took a Locus Poll Award, the two final ones both garnered Hugo Awards and Locus Poll awards, and the final one also received a Jupiter Award from the Instructors of Science Fiction in Higher Education (discontinued in 1979). When the collection was published in Britain, it won the 1979 British Science Fiction Award for Short Fiction. Winner of the BSFA Award for best collection, 1978

Gateway

The Dying Earth

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W&N

Time's Anvil

Richard Morris

History thrives on stories. Time's Anvil explores archaeology's influence on what such stories say, how they are told, who tells them and how we listen. In a dazzlingly wide-ranging exploration, Richard Morris casts fresh light on three quarters of a million years of history in the place we now think of as England. Drawing upon genres that are usually pursued in isolation - such as biography, poetry, or physics - he finds potent links between things we might imagine to be unrelated. His subjects range from humanity's roots to the destruction of the wildwood, from the first farmers to industrialization, and from Tudor drama to twentieth-century conflict. Each topic sits at a different point along the continuum between epoch and the fleeting moment. In part, this is a history of archaeology; in part, too, it is a personal account of the author's history in archaeology. But mainly it is about how the past is read, and about what we bring to the reading as well as what we find. The result is a book that defies categorization, but one which will by turns surprise, enthral and provoke anyone who cares for England, who we are and where we have come from.

Gateway

Necroscope II: Wamphyri!

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